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    • NEWS COVERAGE: Tanks Arrive to Liberate County Park (WSJ)

      NEWS COVERAGE: Tanks Arrive to Liberate County Park (WSJ)

       

       

      Wall-Street-Journal-News-Story---Tanks-arrive-to-liberate-county-park

       

    • Battle of the Bulge Exhibit Honors Those Who Served

      Battle of the Bulge Exhibit Honors Those Who Served

      75 Anniversary-1On Sunday, December 15th, the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, will honor those Americans who fought during the Battle of the Bulge during a day long exhibit from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. that will include veterans who survived the brutal German offensive during the winter of 1944. A parade of opposing tanks will occur at 12 Noon.

      Surrounded by the tanks and armor similar to those that defended our forces, veterans will recount their experiences and speak to visitors.

      What: Day long exhibit memorializing the 19,000 Americans who lost their lives during the Battle of the Bulge in the closing months of WW II with opposing armor passing in review at Noon.

      When: Sunday, December 15, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

      Where: Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration

      Who: Living historians, battle veterans, period armor

    • Tiger Tank Replica Arrives at Museum

      Tiger Tank Replica Arrives at Museum

      ARM-8262

      (Old Bethpage, New York)  As the nation observes the 75th anniversary World War II, the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York, today announced the presentation of an operational replica Tiger tank meant to remind visitors of the American courage and sacrifice required to defeat a well-armed and implacable foe.

      Lawrence Kadish, president and founder of Armor Museum, observed, “We are presenting several replicas of enemy armor for the purpose of instructing thousands of visitors, especially school groups, that defeating tyranny requires courage, sacrifice and valor. Those who faced down the Nazi Tiger knew that their odds of destroying it were small but they confronted it in the knowledge that the Nazis had to be defeated at all costs. This operational reproduction helps tell that story.”

      The enemy “Tiger” was fashioned from a former East German tank that was once part of a massive military force confronting NATO during the Cold War. It was subsequently demilitarized and sold off. In private hands, it was professionally transformed to present the impression of a fierce Tiger tank. The reproduction was sold by the Global War Museum (GWM), Munkedal, Sweden, this year following the review and approval of the Swedish government.  

      Historians note that when it was introduced in 1942, the Tiger was the most powerful tank in the world. Its 88 mm gun was lethal at long range and the tank’s heavy armor made it almost impervious to frontal attack. While few in number, and mechanically fragile, its ability to withstand attacks while destroying Allied tanks from a distance allowed it to assume mythical proportions in battle.

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, History Channel’s Chief Historian Emeritus, observed, “The Tiger lurked just behind the D-Day battlefield,and had they arrived in force they could have confronted the Allied advance with deadly effectiveness. As we seek to make World War II relevant to today’s students, this vehicle will do much to underscore the sacrifice required to free an enslaved continent.”

    • Tanker Foes to Be Presented

      Tanker Foes to Be Presented

      For immediate release 

      On Labor Day Weekend, Saturday, August 31st and Sunday, September 1st between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, will present “Tanker Foes” that will see World War II Allied and replica enemy armor operate in the field.

       Recently added to the museum’s inventory are operational German replica armor meant to underscore the courage and sacrifice of American forces required to confront and defeat a well-armed and implacable foe some 75 years ago.  

      The legendary Sherman tank and M18 Hellcat will face off against a German armor with an expected surprise visit of a replica Tiger tank, one of the most feared weapons on the World War II battlefield. Other armor in operation will include a Cold War U.S. M48 Patton tank, an amphibious U.S. Marine LVT Amtrac used to attack Japanese occupied islands, a British Bren Carrier and a broad range of other historic military vehicles. 

      The program is made possible, in part, through the support of PSEG Long Island, Squad Security, Polimeni International, Bethpage Federal Credit Union, BDG, Ltd., Bristal Assisted Living, and the Nassau County Department of Parks, Recreation and Museums.

       

      American hellcat confronts enemy
      An American Hellcat will confront enemy armor during Tanker Foe weekend at the Museum of American Armor, August 31st and Sept 1st inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage.  

      The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration and is open year  around, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission donations are $13 for adults, $8 for seniors and veterans and children between the ages of 5 and 12. 

      The museum web site is www.museumofamericanarmor.org

      The Museum of American Armor

      1303 Round Swamp Round, Old Bethpage, New York 11804

      Contact:  212 843-8072 / Howard Cannon hcannon@rubenstein.com

    • Historic Armor on Display

      Historic Armor on Display

      From:     The Museum of American Armor / Old Bethpage, New York 516 454-TANK

      Contact: Howard Cannon (212) 843 8072 hcannon@rubenstein.com

      For immediate release

      Museum of American Armor places latest historic armor on field display

      (Old Bethpage, N.Y.) – Representing armor used during the Cold War, the Vietnam War and the Gulf War, The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York, has placed on permanent display four historic military weapons that reflect the role of the American G.I. over the last 50 years. 

      Museum founder and president, Lawrence Kadish, stated, “The latest armor assets that will welcome visitors are meant to pay tribute to those who have served in various operational theaters over the decades, ensuring we have the means to honor all those who have worn the uniform.”

      On display adjacent to the museum is a massive M60 Cold War tank that would have confronted the Soviets during the height of the Cold War in Europe. An M42 “Duster” was originally designed as a mobile anti-aircraft weapon, but it was used to devastating effect in Vietnam. Deployed in the Gulf War, the M110 self-propelled artillery carriage features a howitzer that can place a 200-pound shell on a target some 18 miles away.  An additional howitzer used in Vietnam and the Gulf War has also assumed a place of honor in the museum’s presentation. 

      The armor collection, with some vehicles weighing as much as 50 tons, was transported to the museum in a carefully planned convoy through the efforts of Pedowitz Machinery Movers.

      Dr. Dave Levy, the Armor Museum’s volunteer Manager of Strategic Asset Planning, stated, “Pedowitz is the undisputed national leader in safely transporting oversized loads; and, in our case, tanks and artillery pieces. They brought their expertise and talent to bear in transporting a number of Army-owned assets from Danbury, Connecticut, to our front door, and then placing them exactly where they needed to be.”

      Of equal importance was the role of Opal Construction Corp. of Bayshore, who placed concrete blocks on the ground at precise positions to ensure the multi-ton Army vehicles would never shift or sink into soft soil.   

      “It was clear from the beginning that Opal knew we had entrusted them with helping support vehicles in which American soldiers were asked to defend our freedoms. They did an extraordinary job in preparing the site so that visitors are welcomed by American military history,” continued museum volunteer Al Barto.  Barto, a Marine veteran, spent weeks preparing the necessary documentation that allowed the Armor Museum to take possession of these assets.

      Levy reminded, “Few appreciate that there is almost a pound of paper to document every ton of armor on display.”

    • StuG Replica Arrives at Museum

      StuG Replica Arrives at Museum

      German armor replica acquired by Armor Museum as a reminder of the sacrifice required to defend freedom and defeat the Nazi war machine(Old Bethpage, N.Y.) Mr. Lawrence Kadish, president and founder of The Museum of American Armor, today announced the acquisition of a replica German armor vehicle designed to remind visitors and history students that America’s defense of freedom during World War II came with a heavy cost.
      The replica Sturmgeschüz (or StuG) is meant to represent a German assault weapon that placed a powerful gun on a tank-like chassis. Initially intended to destroy enemy bunkers and similar defensive positions, its low profile, 75 mm cannon and mobility were put to effective use as an ambush weapon as the Allies closed in on the Nazi Reich.
       
       A version of this weapon, the StuG III became Germany’s most produced armored fighting vehicle during World War II, with some 10,000 produced. 
       
      Mr. Kadish observed, “Its acquisition is meant to represent the deadly challenges faced by the Allies as they fought to liberate the world from the murderous scourge of Nazism. It will be periodically displayed as part of the museum’s armor experience program and award-winning educational presentations.”
       
      Michael Sapraicone, Armor Museum board member, and founder and president of Squad Security, said, “The Armor Museum has a considerable array of Allied tanks, halftracks and artillery, allowing it to present a literal parade of American weapons. What it has not been able to do is remind the visitor just how formidable enemy defenses were, and the valor required to confront them. This vehicle allows us to reinforce the story of how we have heroes in our own families who have served, and continue to do so in the defense of our nation.”
      Dr. Libby O’Connell, History Channel’s Historian Emeritus, observed, “With so little time devoted to teaching the events and lessons of World War II in our nation’s classrooms, it is easy to believe that Allied forces swept aside all opposition to end this conflict.  Not only was that not the case, but the loss of life was considerable given the military skill and fierce determination of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. This replica will become an important teaching tool in the months and years to come.”  
      The Museum of American Armor has some 40 operational military vehicles under the roof of a 25,000 square-foot facility inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration in cooperation with the Administration of Nassau County Executive Laura Curran. Opened on the 70thH anniversary of D-Day, 2014, an average of 14,000 people visit every year with special weekends set aside to observe historic military anniversaries.

      The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration and is open year  around, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission donations are $13 for adults, $8 for seniors and veterans and children between the ages of 5 and 12.

      The museum web site is www.museumofamericanarmor.org and is also on Facebook and Instagram. 

    • Vietnam Era Vehicle Acquired

      Vietnam Era Vehicle Acquired

      Museum of American Armor acquires Vietnam War era armor to honor those who served during that conflict(Old Bethpage, N.Y.) Mr. Lawrence Kadish, president and founder of The Museum of American Armor, today announced the acquisition of an iconic Vietnam War armor vehicle that will serve as a keystone to the museum’s commitment to honor those Americans who served during that conflict.

      The V100 Commando, a four wheeled armor vehicle with twin machine guns in a turret, was extensively used during the Vietnam War to protect military convoys heading out to supply remote outposts and to protect air bases housing Huey helicopters and fighter bombers.

      Mr. Kadish observed, “There was not a single patrol where these vehicles were not on the front line and we intend to use the acquisition of the Commando to remind our visitors of the courage and sacrifice of those who served in Vietnam and those who did not come home.”

      The Museum of American Armor has some 40 operational military vehicles under the roof of a 25,000 square foot facility inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration in cooperation with the Administration of Nassau County Executive Laura Curran. Opened on the anniversary of D-Day, 2014, an average of 14,000 people visit every year with special weekends set aside to observe historic military anniversaries.

      Nassau County Executive Laura Curran stated, “Far too few study our nation’s military history and fewer still understand or appreciate the role of our citizen soldiers in defending our nation. The armor museum’s role as an educational center has become crucial, and this latest acquisition adds additional depth to its presentation.”

      Bill Walden, Past VFW Nassau County Commander, and Hicksville VFW Post 3211 Commander, observed, “The Museum of American Armor has become a powerful living tribute for those who have served over the decades. This Vietnam War era military vehicle will ensure that one more chapter is appropriately told to visitors and the families of veterans who come to pause and reflect.”

      Joseph Ingino, of Lindenhurst, Southern District Director of Vietnam Veterans of America, NYS State Council, remembered, “These Commando armored cars were a common sight in Vietnam in that they were always being used to strengthen convoy protection on roads subject to ambush. There will be few Vietnam vets who will not recognize this vehicle and recall their service a very long time ago.”

      V100 Commando was used to protect convoys from ambush

      Referring to the number of American fatalities during the Vietnam War, Michael Sapraicone, museum board member, and founder and president of Squad Security, said, “There are 58,220 compelling reasons to remember this conflict and the armor museum is moving forward on its pledge to do so through the acquisition and presentation of this unique military vehicle.”

      The Commando was first deployed to South Vietnam in 1963 for use by the U.S. Army Military Police, the United States Air Force, the Marine Corps and South Vietnamese military forces. The vehicle carried a crew of two with up to ten soldiers as passengers. Armament often included top-mounted machine guns although other weapons such as M134 Miniguns were sometimes installed to add extra firepower.

      The museum’s efforts are made possible, in part, through the support of PSEG Long Island, Amtrust Title, Squad Security, and Bethpage Federal Credit Union.

    • WWI Centennial to Be Observed

      WWI Centennial to Be Observed

      Veterans Day and the Centennial marking the end of World War I to be observed at the Museum of American ArmorAs the world observes the centennial anniversary of the end of World War I, Boy and Girl Scouts will the reciting many of the names of Long Islanders who served during the Great War, World War II, Korea War, Vietnam War, the Gulf War and Afghanistan during ceremonies at the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York, Sunday, November 11th at 10:30 a.m. Taps will be played at the conclusion of the program at 11:00 a.m.to mark the moment of time when the guns fell silent in 1918.

      The program is made possible, in part, through the support of PSEG Long Island, Greenfield’s Shoprite, Squad Security and Bethpage Federal Credit Union.
      The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration and is open year  around, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

    • Prayers for the Fallen to Be Conducted

      Prayers for the Fallen to Be Conducted

      On the eve of the 45th anniversary of the Yom Kippur War, prayers for the fallen will be offered beside an Israeli tank that survived the surprise assault. Israeli tanker veteran who survived the attack to participateOn the eve of the 45th anniversary of the savage 1973 Yom Kippur War, Jewish prayers for the fallen will be conducted beside a massive Israeli tank that survived the surprise attack on during ceremonies on Tuesday, September 18th, 11:00 a.m. at the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage, Long Island.

      Among those participating in the prayer service will be an Israeli tank battalion commander who survived the Yom Kippur surprise attack, Yuval Neria, now a doctor at Columbia University Medical Center in Manhattan where he is a nationally respected expert on PTS, Nassau County Executive Laura Curran, Nassau County Comptroller Jack Schnirman, among others.

      The M48 tank in the museum’s collection was deployed during the devastating `73 Yom Kippur conflict when Egyptian forces attacked along the Suez Canal. The tank crossed the Canal and succeeded in attacking Arab forces before it was knocked out in a counterattack.

      What:             On the 45th anniversary of the `73 Yom Kippur War, prayer services for the fallen beside an Israeli tank knocked out during that conflict

      When:            Eve of Jewish high holidays, Tuesday, September 18 that 11:00 a.m.

      Where:            Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration (LIE exit 48, one mile south)

      Who:              Yom Kippur War and Israeli tank veteran Dr. Yuval Neria, Jewish religious leaders, Nassau County Executive Laura Curran, Nassau County Comptroller Jack Schnirman, among others

    • Tanker Tactics this Labor Day

      Tanker Tactics this Labor Day

      “Tanker Tactics” to put tanks in the field on Labor Day Weekend to honor GIs who have served in America’s armor divisions(2)On Saturday, and Sunday of Labor Day Weekend, September 1st and 2nd between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, will present a program, “Tanker Tactics” that present in the field a variety of tanks used by American military forces over the decades including a Cold War M48 Patton tank, a WWII Sherman tank, a U.S. Marine tank, a M18 Hellcat tank destroyer as well as halftracks, a British Bren Carrier and other tracked military vehicles.

      The program is made possible, in part, through the support of PSEG Long Island, Amtrust Title, Squad Security and Bethpage Federal Credit Union.

    • Milestone Anniversary to Be Observed

      Milestone Anniversary to Be Observed

      Surrounded by vintage armor, Long Island teens to participate in milestone anniversary observance of integration of U.S. military as scholars and veterans provide historic perspectiveSurrounded by vintage armor, Long Island teens to participate in milestone anniversary observance of integration of U.S. military as scholars and veterans provide historic perspective

      On the 70th anniversary of the landmark desegregation of the United States military, teens from the Tri Community and Youth Agency (Tri CYA), The Academy Charter School and Hofstra University’s Summer Camp program will participate in a program with scholars and veterans that examines President Harry Truman’s historic decision to integrate America’s military  on Thursday, July 26th at 1:00 p.m., at the Museum of American Armor, inside the Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage,

      Among those participating are NYU historian, Dr. Jeffrey Sammons,a noted scholar on African-Americans serving in the U.S. military and Babylon Town Councilwoman Jacqueline Gordon, a Lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves. During her nearly three decades of service, Gordon has been deployed to Germany, Guantanamo Bay, Iraq and Afghanistan. An opening prayer will be offered by Bishop Barrington F. Goldson, of the Calvary Tabernacle Church in Hempstead.

      Surrounded by vintage armor, the students will meet historic reenactors representing African-American soldiers who served in the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, WWI and WWII.They will note that prior to Truman’s action, African Americans were segregated into separate units from their white counterparts and, in many instances, were assigned menial tasks and rarely saw combat. Dr. Sammons will note that those who were on the battlefield displayed enormous courage and bravery under fire but were rarely granted recognition.

       

      What:

      Scholars, veterans, living historians and youngsters to participate in 70th anniversary ceremonies observing the integration of the U.S. military.

      When:        

      Thursday, July 26th at 1:00 P.M.

      Where:      

      Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

    • Fourth of July to Be Observed

      Fourth of July to Be Observed

      Fourth of July to be observed with a display of operational armor from the Museum of American Armor in the Massapequa Park ParadeFor immediate release

      To mark the Fourth of July, armor vehicles from the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, will be participating in the Massapequa Park Parade for the ninth consecutive year, hosting military living historians and veterans as the nation observes its birthday.

      Forming up at Lake Shore Drive by 9:00 a.m., the column will proceed to Park Avenue and the community’s business district where it will take the salute of public officials before returning to the museum. An annual tradition, armor’s parade participation underscores the museum’s mission of paying tribute to those who have defended our freedoms over the generations.

    • WWII Weekend to Pay Tribute to Marines

      WWII Weekend to Pay Tribute to Marines

      A U.S. Marine amphibious assault tank to be unveiled during World War II Encampment Weekend(Old Bethpage, N.Y.) – A rare operational U.S. Marine amphibious assault vehicle similar to those that stormed Japanese held beaches during World War II will be at the center of World War II Weekend to be held on Saturday, May 19th and Sunday May 20th, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., at the Museum of American Armor inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, Long Island.
      The massive LVT will be joined by scores of military living historians who will operate tanks, halftracks, armored cars and artillery in field exercises that recall an era when democracy was under attack.

      World War II Encampment Weekend will also challenge youngsters with mock field exercises while reenactors present uniforms, tactics, and weapons of that era against a backdrop of an armor parade that rivals the newsreels of 70 years ago.
      Honoring the Marines comes on the 75th anniversary of their bloody assault on the Japanese island fortress of Tarawa where thousands of Americans died to take the Pacific outpost. Many of the hard earned lessons from this amphibious attack would be studied by American forces in subsequent battles that eventually pushed the Imperial Japanese Empire back to its home islands before eventual surrender.

      Museum founder Mr. Lawrence Kadish, stated, “World War II will continue to fascinate current and future generations because the stark confrontation between good and evil is so dramatic. In addition, literally everyone has someone in their family’s history who fought in the war, survived the carnage in Europe or Asia, or was lost during that conflict. At a time when few in the classroom can recognize the events of this war, much less its lessons, this effort could not come soon enough.”

      History Channel’s Historian Emeritus Dr. Libby O’Connell said, “This museum is a unique commitment by public and private sectors to preserve and present a seminal chapter in the history of our nation… and our world. It is worth a visit by every American family, regardless of their ethnicity, because this is the story of all of us.”
      Museum board member Frederick Daum, an executive with PSEG Long Island, explained, “The museum remains a compelling family destination, one that offers powerful insight into every family’s connection to our American heritage.”

      Admission is $12 for adults, $7 for children (5-12), seniors (60+), handicapped, volunteer firefighters (Please provide ID).

      For more information, go to www.museumofamericanarmor.org or friend them on Facebook.

       

      Contact:  Rubenstein Associates

      Howard Cannon 212 843-8072 hcannon@rubenstein.com

    • Liberation of Nazi Camps to Be Observed

      Liberation of Nazi Camps to Be Observed

      The liberation of the Nazi death camps to be observed at the Museum of American Armor as hundreds of school children are immersed in the lessons of World War IIAttention: Planning desks

      The April liberation of the Nazi death camps by Allied forces in 1945 will be recalled by World War II G.I. Seymour Kaplan who was among those who liberated Dachau as hundreds of Long Island students participate in a World War II immersion program that introduces them to that pivotal conflict on Friday, April 13th, between 10:00 a.m. and 12 Noon, at the Museum of American Armor inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

      The field trip for students includes a reenactment of armor and battle tactics that seeks to address the ever growing gap in the collective understanding of the lessons of World War II, an increase in anti-Semitic acts and the loss of classroom time in the teaching of history. The effort is in coordination with The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center, Glen Cove and the Nassau County Department of Parks, Recreation & Museums.

      What:            Student immersion into the lessons of World War II including the April      1945 liberation of the Nazi death camps.

      When:            Friday, April 13th between 10:00 a.m. and 12 Noon.

      Where:          Museum of American Armor inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York 11804

      Who:              G.I. liberator Seymour Kaplan, hundreds of Long Island students against a backdrop of operational American WW II armor similar to those that liberated the camps and G.I. living historians.

      Why:              The lessons of World War II including the shattering legacy of the Holocaust are being lost to time and the deliberate reduction of classroom time assigned by the NY Board of Regents.

      Contact: Howard Cannon  212 843-8072

    • Unique Field Trip for History Students

      Unique Field Trip for History Students

      A unique field trip for Long Island’s history students- A World War II battlefieldOld Bethpage, N.Y. – In a move designed to confront the growing disconnect with the lessons of World War II, the most seminal conflict of the last one hundred years, The Museum of American Armor, the Long Island Living History Group (LILHG) and Nassau County’s Old Bethpage Village Restoration are launching a joint educational program that will allow over a thousand Long Island school students to strengthen their understanding of that conflict with a field trip that places them literally “on the battlefield.”

      Entitled “Your Family’s World War II Legacy,” the program integrates classroom curriculum with a field trip to the museum on Friday, April 13th where operational armor and military field tactics will be presented in open woods reminiscent of World War II France.

      Lawrence Kadish, president and founder of the museum, stated, “There is not a family anywhere on Long Island that is not directly connected to the legacy of World War II. The challenge in sustaining that heritage is that the hard lessons learned from that war are rarely explored in any depth in the classroom. This program changes the conversation.”

      Gloria Sesso of the Long Island Council of the Social Studies stated, “The New York State Regents has shown little interest in this era and its continuing impact on the world around us. If the enormous legacy of that earlier American generation is to be upheld, it will be up to us to make a difference. This program addresses what has become a crisis of history illiteracy where students have difficulty identifying not only the root causes of World War II but who were the combatants.”

      Participating Long Island school districts will have students arriving at Old Bethpage Village Restoration throughout the day on April 13th where living historians  will introduce them to how, where and why World War II was fought, followed by armor and infantry field exercises that assault an enemy position. Park officials expect over 1,000 students to visit the military encampment throughout the day.

      Sesso observed, “This program builds on efforts of the armor museum, living historians and Nassau County to create a lasting educational environment that multitasks Old Bethpage Village Restoration. As educators, we welcome them as allies in helping tell the story of a war that forever changed the course of history and one that continues to direct the actions of nations around the world.”

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, History Channel Chief Historian Emeritus and Chairperson of the NYC World War I Centennial Commission, said, “This day-long program has the means to become a statewide model for field trips that immerse students in a period of time that remains a pivotal moment in world history. Those school districts that participate should be commended for going above and beyond the curriculum that seeks merely to `teach to the test.’  Equally important, commendations should be offered to the Museum of American Armor, the living historians and Nassau County for placing these assets before educators and their students.”

    • Living Historians to Commemorate WWI Centennial

      Living Historians to Commemorate WWI Centennial

      During the Centennial of America’s entry into World War I, living historians to present period displays, uniforms and artifacts beside a century old military tankFrom:

      The Museum of American Armor

      Contact:

      Rubenstein Associates
      Howard Cannon
      (212) 843- 8072
      CELL (973)985-9845  
      hcannon@rubenstein.com

      Community Calendar Editors

      During the Centennial of America’s entry into World War I, living historians to present period displays, uniforms and artifacts beside a century old military tank

      On Sunday, February 25th, between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., a squad of World War I living historians will present artifacts, displays, uniforms and military tactics alongside an operational World War I tank at the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, to mark the centennial of America’s entry into The Great War.

      Between 1917 and 1918, Long Island’s Camp Upton was the embarkation point for some 40,000 “Dough Boys” destined for the front were, after training, were placed on Long Island Rail Road cars and traveled west destined for piers in either Brooklyn or Hoboken, New Jersey.

       What: Observing the nation’s WWI Centennial with a display of uniforms, tactics and artifacts beside an operational WWI tank.

       When:  Sunday, February 25th between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.

      Where: Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

    • Century of Military Tech on Display

      Century of Military Tech on Display

      A Century of Military Technology on display this Veterans Day as a rare World War I tank is joined by an armor column of history(Old Bethpage, N.Y.) – Saturday, November 11th, Veterans Day, 2017 will feature a century of tank technology on display between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. at the Museum of American Armor as an extremely rare World War I tank operates with World War II and contemporary tanks on museum grounds, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York.

      The 100 year old M1917 tank is on loan from the Collings Foundation of Stow, Massachusetts as the nation observes the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, and will be the lead vehicle in an armor parade on Veterans Day that includes the legendary Sherman tank of World War II and the M48 Patton tank that served during the Cold War and Vietnam.

      The M1917 was of French design, built by the Americans and is considered the forerunner of every successful tank that followed for the next one hundred years. The exhibit of this historic vehicle that pays tribute to Americans who served during World War I is being made possible, in part, by underwriting grants from PSEG Long Island, Stop & Shop Supermarkets, Bethpage Federal Credit Union and Amtrust Title.

    • Secret Goliath Weapon Unveiled

      Secret Goliath Weapon Unveiled

      Germany’s secret World War II weapon revealed at the Museum of American Armor(Old Bethpage, N.Y.) – A mini unmanned tank filled with high explosives that was one of Nazi Germany’s secret battlefield weapons is now on display at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration in Old Bethpage, New York.

      Nicknamed “Goliath,” it proved to be an operational failure when deployed against Allied forces during World War II, but it became the precursor to many of the remote controlled weapons used by modern 21st Century armies.

      Carrying as much as 220 lbs. of high explosives, they were intended to be guided by remote control and directed to attack tanks, disrupting infantry formations, and demolish buildings or bridges. However, in use, they were found to be slow, cumbersome and controlled by cables that could be easily severed by shellfire.

      Introduced in 1942, Goliaths were used at Anzio in Italy in April 1944, against the Polish resistance during the fateful Warsaw Uprising. A few Goliaths were also reported on the Normandy beaches during D-Day, though none were reported to have inflicted any damage. Battle records suggest that one Goliath managed to successfully destroy a vehicle of the 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion in Southern France.

      “The Goliath was all about innovation on the battlefield,” stated Mark Renton, director of the Museum of American Armor. “It was not successful, but I am sure there were some G.I.’s who had plenty of anxious moments listening for the sound of a robot loaded down with hundreds of pounds of explosives trying to get into position for an attack.”

      The Allies captured many of these weapons and they were subsequently examined by Intelligence officers. They were ultimately dismissed as having little military value. Effective remote controlled weapons would not appear until the 21st Century, but the Goliath reflects a stepping stone towards that goal.

    • Locust Tank Joins the Collection

      Locust Tank Joins the Collection

      Rare Locust tank designed for a World War II glider joins the collection at the Museum of American ArmorThe M22 Locust, an American tank designed to be flown into combat during World War II onboard a massive wooden glider, has joined the collection of operational tanks at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage, New York.

      “Few were built, fewer saw combat and still fewer survived into the 21st Century,” stated Museum Trustee Larry Trivigno, an executive with Bethpage Federal Credit Union. “While it failed to meet its potential in combat, this is a rare tank that sought to address the need for paratroopers to have armor support as soon as they landed in enemy territory.”

      The Locust is one of many artifacts and exhibits that have been donated to the museum by the U.S. Military Museum of Danbury, Connecticut. The New England based institution closed its doors after twenty years of operation and gifted its contents to the Long Island museum as a means of sustaining its legacy.

      Al Barto, who had served as secretary of the U.S. Military Museum, explained, “Development of the Locust began in 1941 after the British War Office requested that the American government design a light tank which could be transported by glider into battle to support British airborne forces. The company Marmon-Herrington designed and built a prototype, and by 1943, the British would receive 260 of the 830 that were ultimately built.”

      Its initial combat debut quickly revealed its shortcomings. In March, 1945, the RAF flew eight Locusts in massive gliders over the Rhine and into battle. Several were damaged during landing and one was quickly knocked out by German fire. Only two Locusts were able to reach their planned rendezvous point and go into action. Drawing more fire from enemy guns and less able to defend airborne troops, they were forced to withdraw and await reinforcements from advancing British armor.

      The Locust never saw active service with the British Army again and was classified as obsolete in 1946. A number of Locusts were used by foreign militaries in the post-war period, with the Egyptian Army using several Locusts during the 1948 Israel War for Independence.

      Museum director Mark Renton observed, “This Locust is still operational but its power train is very fragile, so our plan will be to operate it on rare occasions or on anniversaries that mark the achievements of all Airborne troops in the defense of freedom.”

    • Rare WWI Tank on Loan to Museum

      Rare WWI Tank on Loan to Museum

      Rare World War I tank on loan from The Collings Foundation on display at the Museum of American ArmorThe most influential tank design in a century is one hundred years old

      Through the cooperation of the Collings Foundation, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage, New York, is presenting a rare World War I tank whose design continues to influence modern armor some 100 years after its introduction on the battlefield. The effort is being underwritten, in part, by Stop & Shop Supermarkets, PSEG Long Island, and Bethpage Federal Credit Union.

      The tank, an M1917, is a copy of the French designed FT light tank whose production included a fully rotating turret equipped with a gun. Its design also included a crew compartment in the front, engine compartment at the back, and tank treads along the side, a standard tank layout that continues today.

      The M1917 is thought to be the oldest surviving American tank and is part of the extensive armor collection of The Collings Foundation, now in the midst of constructing what will be a multimillion dollar, world class educational museum at their Stow, Massachusetts campus. Within an interactive setting, it will feature hundreds of tanks and military vehicles that have made history. The Museum of American Armor and The Collings Foundation are members of the Northeast Military Museum Alliance whose mission includes sharing exhibits and educational programs.

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, History Channel Chief Historian Emeritus and Chairperson of the NYC World War I Centennial Commission, said, “This vintage tank is a powerful reminder that the people, places and events that took place a century ago continue to shape our world today. World War I needs to be studied and understood so that we can understand our 21st Century society and the geopolitical forces that continue to impact us. That journey of discovery starts with displays such as this.”

      Rob Collings, Chief Executive Officer of The Collings Foundation, stated, “We are pleased to have this powerful window on World War I available for public display on Long Island where Camp Upton trained tens of thousands of Doughboys before they left for France. That connection alone should allow educators to start a conversation with students regarding this seminal conflict that set borders, reinvented American society and set the stage for an even more horrible conflagration some twenty years later.”

      Historians report that over 3,000 Renault FT tanks were built by France in the closing months of World War I. Another 950 were built under license in the United States (the M1917), but did not enter combat. The Museum of American Armor intends to operate several historic tanks in formation with the Collings owned tank during the time the World War I vehicle is on loan. Those dates will be announced shortly.

    • Museum to Acquire Exhibits from Connecticut Location

      Museum to Acquire Exhibits from Connecticut Location

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will be the recipient of tanks, armor vehicles, photos, uniforms, military equipment, and various exhibits totaling over 10,000 artifacts donated by the U.S. Military Museum in Danbury, Connecticut, which is closing its doors after 22 years of operation.

      Museum of American Armor acquires the tanks and exhibits of a Connecticut based military museum

      Lawrence Kadish, founder of the Museum of American Armor welcomes (right) Al Barto of the U.S. Military Museum, Danbury, Connecticut as the New England museum donates its exhibits and armor assets to the New York institution in an unprecedented gift that allows their legacy to live on in a new home.

      The decision to close was made by the Connecticut based board earlier this month.

      “The strength of our exhibits and the underlying mission have never wavered,” stated Al Barto, U.S. Military Museum Secretary. “From its first day to its last, this museum has been about paying tribute to the American G.I., and our defense of freedom. This is a difficult decision for us but it was made with considerable care to ensure that the legacy of the U.S. Military Museum lives on by gifting our assets to the Museum of American Armor on Long Island.”

      Lawrence Kadish, Founder and President of the Museum of American Armor, stated, “Anyone who opens their museum doors to the public recognizes we are custodians of our nation’s military heritage. Our Danbury colleagues created a powerful destination over the years that reminded visitors of our collective debt to those who have worn the uniform of America’s military. With their donation of armor and exhibits we have expanded our responsibility to continue honoring that legacy of courage and valor.”

      Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, who quickly approved plans for private dollars to build the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, stated, “This decision underscores the importance of this museum in a very short period of time. Other institutions in other states now recognize its leadership role and its ability to serve as a guardian of our nation’s military history.”

      A commitment to a common mission 

      “There is enormous talent among our two institutions and a tremendous amount of respect for each other and for our respective accomplishments,” offered Mark Renton, director of the Museum of American Armor. “We look forward to working with volunteers from the U.S. Military Museum as we accept their donation which reflects their hard work and incredible dedication to a common mission.”

      The Long Island based museum will be receiving a number of unusual armor assets and displays that include a Locust tank, one of the very few fighting vehicles of World War II designed to fit inside a glider, a German Kettenkrad, whose design suggests a motorcycle with tank tracks, an Italian designed German staff car, a M36 Jackson tank destroyer, and displays that focus on America’s War on Terror, the Korean conflict and Vietnam.

        Previously named the Military Museum of Southern Connecticut, at the heart of its collection was a massive M18 Hellcat tank destroyer. It was placed on loan at the Museum of American Armor two years ago and brought back to operational life by the museum’s volunteer staff.

      “Their commitment to mechanical excellence, operational safety, and an appreciation of what this vehicle represents convinced us that our museum’s legacy would be in good hands,” concluded Barto. “We know that our various artifacts will now be housed in an environment where visitors will continue to learn of the valor and courage of those who have defended, and continue to defend, our freedoms.”

      Veterans representing a broad range of organizations attend the announcement that armor and exhibits from the U.S. Military Museum in Connecticut are being donated to the Museum of American Armor on Long Island, including the Hellcat tank destroyer that “arrived” during ceremonies.

      Fred Daum, Museum of American Armor board member and Director of Customer Contact at PSEG Long Island stated, “We are proud and honored to assume responsibility for these donated military artifacts. They not only help tell our nation’s story but those individuals who are quite often members of our own family. It is our mission to ensure that heritage is never allowed to be forgotten.”

      Joining Daum was Eileen Daly Sapraicone, an associate board member and Nassau County Family Court, Support Magistrate. “We gratefully accept these and the many military artifacts to follow with an understanding that today’s announcement is about something far more important than physical exhibits. It’s about the veterans who stand with us today and the visitors who will come here tomorrow.”

      Veterans representing a broad range of organizations attend the announcement that armor and exhibits from the U.S. Military Museum in Connecticut are being donated to the Museum of American Armor on Long Island, including the Hellcat tank destroyer that “arrived” during ceremonies.

      The Museum of American Armor will begin displaying selected artifacts donated to them over the next several months as armor, uniforms and other displays are relocated from Danbury. 

    • Dingo Makes Its Debut at Museum

      Dingo Makes Its Debut at Museum

      Museum of American Armor welcomes a British armor legend that served from Dunkirk to Berlin-2The Museum of American Armor, located inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is now home to a British World War II armor legend, the Dingo, an armored scout car that would have been found on the beaches of Dunkirk during the retreat of 1940 and helping liberate the Nazi death camps in 1945.

      “Of modest size, the Dingo was fast, reliable and literally served the British from the beginning of World War II to the end of that conflict. It was deployed in all theaters of the conflict, from the Libyan desert fighting Rommel to the British reconnaissance units that came upon the infamous Bergen-Belsen concentration camp as the Nazi Third Reich was collapsing. As a further measure of its design, the Dingo continued to serve the British Army until 1952 and the armies of Portugal and Cyprus into the 1970s,” explained museum director Mark Renton.

      The Dingo is one of the vehicles found in the background of the current movie “Dunkirk.” Several hundred of these scout cars were left throughout France as the British were forced to abandon all their equipment while being rescued by a flotilla of Royal Navy ships and private vessels following German victories.

      The Dingo had 4-wheel drive for reliable off-road travel and also 4-wheel steering, giving the compact scout car an incredibly tight turning radius of less than 25 feet. The Daimler 6-cylinder engine could power the Dingo to over 50 MPH, yet combined with a sizable fuel tank, was economical enough to give the car a range of about 200 miles. Its two man crew, a driver and a radio operator/gunner, was protected by relatively light armor, but capable of stopping most enemy pistol and rifle rounds. The museum’s Dingo also carries a replica .303 caliber Bren Gun used by the British.

      Museum of American Armor welcomes a British armor legend that served from Dunkirk to Berlin

      Museum associate board member Eileen Daly Sapraicone explained, “The ability to create an Allied armored column that replicates the sights and sounds of World War II is one of the most compelling educational tools we have to recount the story of democracy’s courage, valor and sacrifice. Place it in this setting of Old Bethpage Village Restoration during special weekends when an environment so reminiscent of the WWII era countryside, and you have created a virtual time machine that ensures indelible memories for entire families.”

    • Hellcat Tank to Be Presented

      Hellcat Tank to Be Presented

      Military Museum Alliance will result in M18 Hellcat operating at the Museum of American ArmorThree military museums have created the Northeast Military Museum Alliance to coordinate programs, educational initiatives and marketing strategies that will allow the group to strengthen their its collective efforts in contributing to the region’s destination tourism economy and understanding of our nation’s past.

      An immediate response to that alliance is the presentation of an operational M18 Hellcat tank destroyer at the Museum of American Armor during its upcoming World War II Weekend (May 20th and 21st), a vehicle now on long term loan from the U.S. Military Museum in Danbury Connecticut.

      Other founding members of the alliance include the Collings Foundation in Stow, Massachusetts.

      Applauding the Alliance’s formation is Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chief Historian Emeritus of the History Channel. She stated, “Whether it’s a Lincoln living historian in Illinois or the Red Baron flying from a Rhinebeck farm, there is no question that heritage tourism has become a multibillion dollar industry throughout the United States. The formation of this group demonstrates the kind of mutual benefit that can be derived by sharing ideas, resources and common goals. It may be viewed as a national model, and I urge other heritage destinations to pursue similar collaborative efforts.”

      Alliance member, Rob Collings, Chief Executive Officer of the Collings Foundation, explained, “Far too often museums work in `silos, and that isolation hurts their strategic goals and damages their bottom line. This coalition breaks through that culture and embraces combined experiences, expertise and resources to assist every member.”

      In addition to a world famous aircraft collection that tours the nation under “Wings of Freedom,” The Collings Foundation is the steward of the legendary Littlefield Collection of military technology that includes over one hundred historic tanks and armor vehicles.  Many of those assets will be on display at the Collings’ Stow, Massachusetts educational complex.

      “There is enormous talent among our respective institutions and a tremendous degree of respect for each other and our accomplishments,” offered Lawrence Kadish, founder and president of the Museum of American Armor. “Collectively we have the means to create a compelling force for preserving and projecting our nation’s heritage to a new generation.”

      The Museum of American Armor sits under a 25,000 square foot facility inside Nassau County’s Old Bethpage Village Restoration on Long Island where visitors can see its collection of operational armor operating along country roads and wooded fields, suggesting France, 1944.

      Al Barto, Board secretary at the U.S. Military Museum in Danbury, Connecticut, agreed, “We have the means to meet our collective mission by creating a mutual assistance alliance that allows us to support each other by sharing our individual experiences and common purpose.”

      The group’s formation is an outgrowth of an earlier alliance that was created under the umbrella of the “I Love New York” campaign managed by the Empire State Development Corporation. The latest effort is not affiliated with any government agencies and crosses three state borders so that its members may exchange creative programs, share strategic insight, generate online cross-marketing and advocate on behalf of expanded heritage tourism and educational initiatives.

       

    • Amphibious Assault Tank to Be Unveiled

      Amphibious Assault Tank to Be Unveiled

      World War II Weekend at The Museum of American Armor will pay tribute to the U.S. Marines who stormed Pacific beaches Observing the 75th anniversary of the fierce battle for TarawaThe Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, will honor U.S. Marine veterans during World War II Weekend, May 20th and 21st, held at Old Bethpage Village Restoration when it operates a massive Marine amphibious assault tank similar to those used in capturing Japanese held islands.

      The rare World War II era LVT (Landing Vehicle Tracked) “Buffalo” amphibious assault vehicle was presented to the museum by Thea Kronlund as part of a joint decision to create a permanent living tribute to her late husband and armor collector, Mr. Kevin Kronlund and his national leadership in keeping alive our nation’s military heritage.

      Mrs. Kronlund stated, “On the eve of Kevin’s death the Museum of American Armor acquired his Long Tom cannon and M 4 artillery tractor for the purpose of making it a cornerstone of the museum’s armor collection. Over the passage of time the museum has repeatedly honored Kevin’s legacy when visitors come to tour their facility. Given that the museum is located within one of the largest veterans populations in the United States, we thought his LVT would be an appropriate means of creating a lasting tribute to Kevin’s legacy that can be appreciated by many.”

      Capable of being launched from ships off shore to allow Marines to assault a fortified beach, the museum’s LVT has been retrofitted to allow it operate safely on land. It will be joined by other operational vehicles, including a Sherman tank, a Stuart tank, armor cars, towed artillery and field exercises conducted by squads of living historians.

      A U.S. Marine amphibious assault tank to be unveiled during World War II Encampment Weekend-2World War II Weekend is sponsored by PSEG Long Island, Bethpage Federal Credit Union, Stop & Shop Supermarkets, Amtrust Title and Squad Security.
      History Channel’s Historian Emeritus Dr. Libby O’Connell said, “This museum is a unique commitment by public and private sectors to preserve and present a seminal chapter in the history of our nation… and our world. It is worth a visit by every American family, regardless of their ethnicity and life experience because this is the story of all of us.”

      Museum associate board member Eileen Daly Sapraicone explained, “The ability to create an armored column that replicates the sights and sounds of American forces during World War II is one of the most compelling educational tools we have to recount the story of our courage, valor and sacrifice. Place it in this setting so reminiscent of the WWII era countryside, and you have created a virtual time machine that ensures indelible memories for entire families.”

    • Bethpage FCU Exec Appointed to Museum Board

      Bethpage FCU Exec Appointed to Museum Board

      President and founder of the Museum of American Armor, Lawrence Kadish, has announced that Lawrence Trivigno, Assistant Vice President of Business Development for Bethpage Federal Credit Union, has been appointed to serve on the museum’s board. He joins former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Ed Blumenfeld of BDG, Ltd., Michael Polimeni of Polimeni International, Frederick Daum of PSEG Long Island, Michael Sapraicone of Squad Security, Steve Napolitano of Amtrust Title Insurance Company, Rev. Calvin Butts, president of SUNY at Old Westbury, and Reese Dameron, Esq., an attorney with the New York law firm of Boies Schiller Flexner LLP.

      Larry Trivigno Headshot

      Lawrence is a graduate of SUNY Farmingdale with a degree in Computer Programming & Information Systems and is currently pursuing an additional degree in communications. A Deer Park resident, he is active in a broad range of volunteer organizations that underscore his personal commitment to worthy causes and the support his employer, Bethpage Federal Credit Union, offers to organizations across the region.

      Museum trustee Michael Sapraicone stated, “Lawrence and Bethpage Federal Credit Union (BFCU) represent the powerful corporate commitment our region has to honoring the courage and valor of our veterans. We are delighted to welcome him to the board so that we may be assured of continuing to expand our role as a destination for families to learn more about their own citizen soldiers and to serve as an educational center for our thousands of annual visitors.”

      Mr. Trivigno said, “I am deeply honored to be associated with a museum that has breathed life into our American military heritage and the family history of so many New Yorkers. I believe we have a responsibility to keep their individual stories alive and this institution has effectively harnessed armor vehicles for the purpose of achieving that goal. Having participated in one of its programs I know firsthand just how effective it is in fulfilling its mission, and I look forward to building on that success.”

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers over seventy years ago.

      It is open Wednesday through Sunday, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Admission is $12 for adults; $8 for children 5 – 12 (under 5 admitted free); and $8 for seniors, volunteer firefighters and veterans. Admission provides visitors with access to both the armor museum and the adjacent Old Bethpage Village Restoration. More information can be found at www.museumofamericanarmor.org and on Facebook.

    • Museum Holiday Gift Packages Available

      Museum Holiday Gift Packages Available

      Armor experience the perfect holiday gift for that history buff as tanks put visitors back in time at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration-2Putting history enthusiasts in the middle of a column of operational World War II tanks is now the perfect Christmas gift being offered by the Museum of American Armor at Nassau County’s Old Bethpage Village Restoration, allowing visitors to go back in time when American forces raced for the Nazi border in 1944.

      With a $100 gift package, field orders can be placed under the tree for a spring 2017 “offensive” where recipients will be provided with instructions on tactics and field strategy after they don GI uniforms and place themselves inside the museum’s armor as they maneuver in the woods of Old Bethpage Village Restoration. As they approach a potential enemy ambush they will be escorted by a Sherman tank to provide necessary cover.

      Endorsed by the Long Island Council on the Social Study and applauded by the History Channel’s historian emeritus, the Museum of American Armor provides a unique armor experience unavailable anywhere else in the northeast. It has become a powerful living history lesson for those seeking to better appreciate the heroes in their own families as well as the world we live in today.

    • Fun Facts About the Museum of American Armor

      Fun Facts About the Museum of American Armor

      Little known facts about the Museum of American Armor-2

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is the home to over 30 operational armor vehicles that present our American military heritage, courage and valor under one roof.

      From the iconic Sherman tank to armored cars that liberated occupied Europe to a classic Lassalle sedan that would have been used by an Admiral attending to business at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the museum also conducts armor experience that allow visitors to join an armored column seeking enemy snipers in the woods surrounding the park.

      Little known facts about the Museum of American Armor

      The Museum of American Armor began with a modest display of a single military truck pulling an anti-aircraft gun at Republic Airport less than a decade ago and quickly grew to become one of the most important armor collections on public display in the Northeast.

      Little known facts about the Museum of American Armor-3

      When the museum operates its rare gasoline powered Dragon Wagon tank transporter its miles per gallon is measured in the low single digits. Fortunately they don’t need to liberate Paris.

      Long Island is home to one of the largest veterans populations in the United States and many families come to the armor museum to discover for the first time that they have heroes in their own homes. Bethpage Federal Credit Union is sponsoring an oral histories program at the armor museum that seeks to capture those stories.

      When the museum imported its Sherman tank from Europe it needed approvals from the State Department, the Defense Department, Customs, the Port of New York, the Longshoreman’s Union and the Department of Agriculture. The Aggies wanted all European mud removed before it left the Port of Antwerp.

      The Museum of American Armor has become an important part of the economy given the power of heritage tourism in the region. A national survey found that heritage travelers who seek to connect with America’s past spend an average of $994 per trip compared to only $611 for other leisure travelers.

      Little known facts about the Museum of American Armor-5Old Bethpage Village Restoration allows visitors to become immersed in a Long Island of the 1850s so armor museum activities within the park are deliberately designed not to violate that time/space continuum. However, once a year a “Military Timeline” presentation allows visitors to see in one field Americans under arms from the Revolutionary War through the Persian Gulf War.

      The armor museum not only has an Israeli tank that survived the savage 1973 Yom Kippur War in the Middle East but it tracked down an Israeli tanker who was part of the battalion that bore the brunt of the surprise attack that breached their defenses along the Suez Canal. Now living in New York, the tanker won the Israeli version of the Medal of Honor and was recently given the chance to drive the tank adjacent to the museum with his family onboard.

      Finding repair parts for 70 year old vehicles is a full time job. Museum director Mark Renton had to find and replace the engine on the Sherman tank several years ago and he did it without a manual. No, there is no “check engine light” And yes, it was out of warranty.

      Little known facts about the Museum of American Armor-6Congressman Peter King was recently invited to join living historians portraying WWII GIs on maneuvers outside the museum. Joining the “GIs” on line for a field kitchen serving of Spam (heavily processed meat in a sealed can that was widely used during WWII) he gamely tried it during a live News 12 broadcast and was barely able to swallow it. Keeping his sense of humor he told reporters, “Maybe we should put this on the menu at the Congressional cafeteria…” He did not ask for seconds.

    • Veterans Day Weekend to Be Observed

      Veterans Day Weekend to Be Observed

      Amphibious Assault Tank with Marines carrying Flag

      To mark Veterans Day Weekend, on Saturday, November 12 and Sunday November 13, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, will unveil its rare amphibious assault tank used by U.S. Marines during World War II to liberate Japanese held islands across the Pacific. The LVT (Landing Vehicle Tank) will be joined in the field by a Stuart tank and other vehicles used by the Marines during its hard won campaigns during World War II.

      Other armor on display will be a Cold War M48 Patton tank, a Sherman tank, the equally rare Dragon Wagon recovery vehicle as halftracks and other military vehicles. The program is made possible, in part, through the support of Bethpage Federal Credit Union and Stop & Shop Supermarkets.

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano is inviting the public as well as all veterans, families and friends to this unique event and looks forward to welcoming the families of veterans who served as a means of recognizing the heroes among us.

      The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration and is open year  around, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission donations are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, veterans and children.

    • Thomas DiNapoli to Be Honored by Museum

      Thomas DiNapoli to Be Honored by Museum

      NYS State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli to be honored for his veterans advocacy by the Museum of American Armor  

      Former New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly will share awards program

      New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli will be honored for his continued advocacy on behalf of veterans throughout the state during the annual gala dinner at the Museum of American Armor, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, the evening of November 16th, when former New York City Police Commissioner and U.S. Marine veteran Ray Kelly will also be the recipient of the museum’s Military Heritage Award.

      dinapoli Speaking

      State Comptroller DiNapoli stated, “I am deeply honored to receive the museum’s Veterans Advocacy Award. New York is home to nearly 900,000 men and women who have served bravely to safeguard our freedom. Across the country and in our state, and from my own family’s experience, I know that we will forever be indebted to our veterans for their service and sacrifices. I will continue to support our military and their families as well as the programs that help them return to civilian life.”

      The State Comptroller’s late father, Nicholas DiNapoli, who died this year at the age of 92, was an U.S. Army Air Corps veteran.

      Former Commissioner Kelly to share Armor Museum honors

      Joining State Comptroller DiNapoli during the ceremonies will be former NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, a combat veteran of the Vietnam War. He led fellow Marines as a First Lieutenant, during the bloody, chaotic battles of Operation Harvest Moon that broke the back of a Viet Cong offensive south of Da Nang.  Upon returning home, Commissioner Kelly joined the Marine Reserves and retired with the rank of Colonel.  He is currently vice chairman of K2 Security and also serves on the Museum’s board.

      The dinner is being chaired by former U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato and co-chaired by Steve Napolitano, Senior Executive Vice President of AmTrust Title and President of the Direct Title Division; Michael Sapraicone, president and founder of Squad Security; and Eileen Daly-Sapraicone, Nassau County Associate Magistrate. Also serving as dinner co-chairs are Jan Burman and Steve Krieger of Bristal Assisted Living.

      Two patriots deserving of recognition

      Former U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato stated, “Tom DiNapoli and Ray Kelly are two enormously dedicated individuals who have served the people of New York. But both have also been deeply committed to the welfare of our veterans, and by being honored by the Museum of American Armor, we are reminded just how effectively these two men have `led from the front’ on this issue.”

      Mr. Kelly explained, “I accept this honor with the understanding that I am representing the hundreds of thousands of Americans who served in Vietnam during that conflict and those men and women who continue to serve in our military today. My experience was not unique, but the courage and valor of those I served with certainly was.”

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today during the ongoing War on Terror.

      Nassau County Executive Mangano stated, “I cannot think of two people who deserve these honors more. I look forward to congratulating both of them.”

      With some 35 operational armored vehicles, the museum is open year round, Wednesday through Sunday, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10, adults; $7, and $7 for seniors, volunteer firefighters, children and veterans.

    • Ray Kelly to Be Honored by Museum

      Ray Kelly to Be Honored by Museum

      Former NYPD Commissioner and Vietnam vet Ray Kelly to be honored by the Museum of American Armor

      (Old Bethpage, N.Y) The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration has announced that former New York City Police Commissioner and U.S. Marine Corps veteran Ray Kelly will be presented with the museum’s Military Heritage Award during this year’s gala dinner to be held at the museum on November 16th.

      Ray Kelly armor honoree

      Museum founder and president, Lawrence Kadish stated, “This year’s honoree was obvious to our nominating committee. Ray Kelly personifies American exceptionalism. From his leadership as a Marine to serving as America’s premier police commissioner, his extraordinary career is an inspiration to us, and countless Americans.”

      Mr. Kelly was the longest serving Commissioner of the New York City Police Department in its history and rose from cadet to the department’s top job during his 47 years on the force. The Commissioner is a combat veteran of the Vietnam War. He led fellow Marines as a First Lieutenant including the bloody, chaotic battles of Operation Harvest Moon that broke the back of a Viet Cong offensive south of Da Nang.  Upon returning home, Commissioner Kelly joined the Marine Reserves and retired with the rank of Colonel.  He is currently vice chairman of K2 Security and serves on the Museum board.

      He also has served as commissioner of the U.S. Customs Service, where he managed the agency’s 20,000 employees and $20 billion in annual revenue. For his accomplishments at Customs, Commissioner Kelly was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Medal for Exceptional Service. From 1996 to 1998, Commissioner Kelly was undersecretary for enforcement at the U.S. Treasury Department (the third highest post in the department at the time). There, he supervised the department’s enforcement bureaus including the U.S. Customs Service, the U.S. Secret Service, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.

      Reflecting on his life in law enforcement, he is the author of the bestselling book, “Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting its Empire City.”

      Integrity, Professionalism and Vision

      Gala Dinner co-chairman, former U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato stated, “I have had the honor of knowing Ray Kelly for over forty years and during that time his reputation as a man of enormous personal integrity and professional expertise has only grown here and around the world. He has defended our freedoms abroad and our neighborhoods here in the greatest city in the world. This award is recognition that this insightful, effective law enforcement and security expert has not only walked the beat but defended our nation as well.”

      Mr. Kelly explained, “I accept this honor with the understanding that I am representing the hundreds of thousands of Americans who served in Vietnam during that conflict and those men and women who continue to serve in our military today. My experience was not unique, but the courage and valor of those I served with certainly was.”

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano welcomed the announcement. “The Museum of American Armor could not have a better ally than Ray Kelly. I look forward to attending this gala dinner, a fitting tribute to an extraordinary patriot in a setting that speaks to the valor of every American who has served our country.”

      Fellow dinner co-chairman Michael Sapraicone, president of Squad Security, observed, “As a former First Grade NYPD Detective, I can tell you from personal and professional experience that Ray Kelly had a profound impact on everyone touched by his tenure. He has raised the bar for all.”

      A career in law enforcement

      With fifty years in public service, including 14 years as police commissioner of the City of New York, Raymond W. Kelly is one of the world’s most well-known and highly esteemed leaders in law enforcement. Kelly was appointed police commissioner in January 2002 by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, making Kelly the longest serving police commissioner in the city’s history, as well as the first to hold the post for a second, separate tenure. He also served as police commissioner under Mayor David N. Dinkins from 1992 to 1994.

      In 2002, Commissioner Kelly created the first counterterrorism bureau of any municipal police department in the country. He also established a new global intelligence program and stationed New York City detectives in 11 foreign cities. In addition to dedicating extensive resources to preventing another terrorist attack, the NYPD had driven violent crime down by 40 percent from 2001 levels.

      Commissioner Kelly holds a BBA from Manhattan College, a JD from St. John’s University School of Law, an LLM from New York University Graduate School of Law, and an MPA from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has been awarded honorary degrees from the Catholic University of America, Manhattan College, St. John’s University, the State University of New York, the College of St. Rose, Iona College, Marist College, New York University, Pace University, Quinnipiac University, and St. Thomas Aquinas College.

      Those wishing to join the Museum of American Armor in honoring Ray Kelly are invited to contact the museum through its web site, www.museumofamericanarmor.org

    • Tanker Saturday to Honor GIs

      Tanker Saturday to Honor GIs

      “Tanker Saturday” to put tanks in the field to honor GIs who have served in America’s armor divisions

      On Saturday, August 6th at 12 Noon, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, will honor America’s citizen soldiers who have served in the nation’s armor divisions by operating in the field a Cold War M48 Patton tank, a WWII Sherman tank, a Pacific theater Stuart tank, as well as half tracks and other tracked military vehicles. The program is made possible, in part, through the support of PSEG.

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano is inviting the public as well as all veterans and their families to this unique event and looks forward to welcoming the families of veterans who served and many who were trained to either operate or maintain armored vehicles, trucks and other Army and Marine vehicles.

      “The Museum of American Armor has become a living classroom that continues to provide us all with a better understanding of the legacy of freedom provided by our veterans,” stated County Executive Mangano. “We look forward to seeing these historic tanks in operation, but more important is the opportunity to say `thank you’ to all who have served and those who continue to wear the uniform.”

      PSEG’s Frederick Daum explained, “Our support for this program underscores PSEG’s continuing efforts to connect our region with the veterans who live in literally every Long Island neighborhood and every town.  From creating career opportunities for those who have recently returned from deployment to strengthening educational programs that ensure a new generation of Americans understands their heritage, we believe this is an important mission as a community partner.”

      PSEG’s support will allow the armor museum to place its period armor tanks in simultaneous field operation in salute to the American veteran and is inviting all those who have served, and their families, to witness the display.

      Museum founder and president, Lawrence Kadish, observed, “These tanks have been acquired over time for a single purpose, to honor those who have served our nation. Now more than ever we need to pause and give thanks to those who have worn the uniform.”

      Bill Walden, Commander of the Nassau County Council of Veterans of Foreign Wars, stated, “This presentation is a powerful reminder of America continuing to stand tall against tyranny, the courage of those who have served and the commitment of Nassau County and supporters such as PSEG to make these programs available to the public.”

      Tanks that will be operating include the Cold War M48 Patton tank, although the museum’s example actually served with the Israeli Defense Forces and fought during the 1973 Yom Kippur War along the Suez Canal. Considered surplus by the United States by the early 1960s, it was transferred to Jordan as part of a military assistance program that existed between the two nations. During the 1967 Six Day War Israeli forces captured this M48 and incorporated it into its own tank force.

      Mangano visit to Armor Museum

      The classic M4 Sherman tank of World War II will also be rolling out the museum doors, one of the most famous and recognizable tanks of all time. Production exceeded 50,000 with a number of different manufacturers producing a broad range of variants, many of them modified in the field. With nowhere near the hitting power or protective armor of the late war German tanks, the Sherman was one of the most dependable and rugged tanks of World War II. Once tactics were developed that allowed them to assault German Tigers and Panthers from ambush the Sherman would prove deadly on the battlefield.

      The museum’s Stuart reconnaissance tank was extensively used in the Pacific as its smaller size made it easier to maneuver in the jungle fighting that characterized that conflict, and was often deployed by Marine units. In Europe the Stuart was deployed as an armored scout whose mission was to spot the enemy and then report back so reinforcements could be brought to the front.

      The Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration and is open year  around, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, veterans and children.

    • Stop & Shop Receives American Heritage Award

      Stop & Shop Receives American Heritage Award

      Stop & Shop Supermarkets receives American Heritage Award from the Museum of American Armor

      The Museum of American Armor, Old Bethpage, New York has announced that Stop & Shop Supermarket Company is the recipient of its American Heritage Award for 2015 in recognition of their sustained support of programs that honor those who have worn our nation’s military uniform within the largest veterans population in the United States.Stop Shop Vet Award

      A longtime supporter of the Museum of American Armor, Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano stated, “Stop & Shop’s sponsorship of programs at this world class educational destination provides a compelling opportunity to pay tribute to the heroes in our own families.  This museum is particularly unique as its collection of 30 operational vehicles creates powerful interactive programs that bring our nation’s heritage to life. Stop & Shop has the gratitude of countless veterans and their families.”

      New York State Assemblyman Charles Lavine observed, “We have learned through much heartache and sacrifice that democracies must be strong to defend the very principle of freedom. Stop & Shop’s support is not only timely but crucial if we are to remain focused on what has been required to protect our nation.”

      Stop & Shop’s New York Manager of Public and Community Relations, Arlene Putterman, stated, “I am proudly accepting this award on behalf of every Stop & Shop associate who is honored to stand with our American veterans. We believe we have a solemn responsibility to support efforts such as these so that a new generation understands and appreciates the sacrifices of those who have served.”

      Among the programs sponsored by Stop & Shop during 2015 was a play presented at the museum entitled “A Piece of my Heart” which offered a compassionate look at women who served in Vietnam, as well as a program that honored the men and women of the Fighting 69th Regiment based on Long Island.

      The Museum of American Armor is a 501 ( C 3 ), state chartered not-for-profit facility housed within 25,000 square feet of space on the grounds of a rolling county preserve where it presents over 30 operational armored vehicles within the broad context of telling the story of the American soldier. It has won awards from the Council on the Social Studies, and has been cited by New York State Regent Roger Tilles and Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chief Historian Emeritus of the History Channel for its role as an interactive educational institution.

    • Candlelight Prayer Service to Be Held

      Candlelight Prayer Service to Be Held

      On the anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, a candle light prayer service at the Museum of American Armor to honor those G.I.s who withstood the deadly German WWII counteroffensive

      Battle-Of-The-Bulge-2015On Sunday, December 20, at 4:30 p.m., the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, joined by WW II veterans of that battle, will conduct a candle light prayer vigil to pay tribute to the 19,000 Americans who lost their lives during the savage German Ardennes counter offensive 71 years ago this month and remember the 70,000 GIs who were wounded.

      Surrounded by the tanks and armor similar to those that defended our forces, the program will include veterans of what history now calls the Battle of the Bulge and clergy will conduct a period service including a prayer General George Patton asked to be written beseeching the Lord for weather that would allow him to speed reinforcements to the front.

      What:            Candle light vigil and vintage prayer service memorializing the 19,000 Americans who lost their lives during the Battle of the Bulge, 71 years ago this month

      When:            Sunday, December 20, 4:30 p.m.

      Where:          Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration

      Who:              Veterans, clergy, living historians, operational WW II armor

    • December Gala to Honor Alfonse D’Amato

      December Gala to Honor Alfonse D’Amato

      U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato to receive American Heritage Leadership Award from Museum of American Armor at gala December dinner

      The Museum of American Armor has announced that U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato will be the recipient of its American Heritage Leadership Award to be presented this December 3rd when he is the honoree at the museum’s gala dinner to be held at its facility on the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage.

      “I am accepting this honor on behalf of American soldiers throughout the years who have defended our nation’s freedoms,” Senator D’Amato stated. “The Museum of American Armor has become a powerful living tribute to the courage of our citizen soldiers and I am privileged to play a role in ensuring it can continue to fulfill its mission.”

      For Senator D’Amato the historic connection is real, personal and still very much part of his family’s heritage. He father was a World War II veteran and his mom a “Rosie the Riveter,” having worked in defense plants during that conflict.

      “My parents were part of that `Greatest Generation’ and their story still speaks to us. However our nation is in danger of losing its connection to that era and with it the enormous lessons that still speak to us.

      Honorary Dinner chairmen Peter S. Kalikow said, “Americans continue to struggle with their history literacy. Tests and surveys reveal a stunning disconnect to our nation’s heritage, the lessons learned and how our future is being shaped by our past. This museum seeks to address part of that deficit and I am delighted that Senator D’Amato is being recognized for his role in supporting this institution.”

      In a letter to the gathering, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer stated, “Since its foundation the museum has worked tireless to educate students in our community about the sacrifice, valor and honor that our Second World War veterans displayed while serving overseas. The museum’s partnership with the Long Island Council for the Social Studies demonstrates its dedication to our heritage. Senator D’Amato has a long history of public service…He has my wholehearted congratulations on receiving this honor.”

      Museum trustee and former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly stated, “Senator D’Amato has consistently demonstrated in word and deed his commitment to a strong American military. He is uniquely qualified to receive this award from the Museum of American Armor as he knows full well no democracy, least of all ours, can afford to forget its military heritage or sacrifices required to protect our freedoms.”

      colors - acting soldiers saluting American Flag

      An intergenerational education center

      Operational vehicles on public display include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns, a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, the tank transporter nicknamed “the Dragon Wagon,” anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral, to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks. Also on operational view is a massive M48 Patton tank used by the Israelis during the fierce Yom Kippur War of 1973.

      Beyond World War II programs, tributes have been held to the American service men and women who have served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Iraq, Afghanistan and the War on Terror so that the museum is able to fulfill its mission of honoring America’s defense of freedom throughout the decades.

      The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 AM to 4 PM.  Admission is $10, adults; $7, children 5 – 12 (under 5 are free); and $7, seniors, volunteer firefighters and veterans. Admission to the armor museum also allows you access to Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

    • Long-Term Loan from Connecticut Museum Reflects Regional Alliance

      Long-Term Loan from Connecticut Museum Reflects Regional Alliance

      Museum of American Armor welcomes rare M18 Hellcat to its presentation

      Long term loan from Connecticut armor museum reflects regional alliance

      The U.S. Military Museum of Connecticut and the Museum of American Armor on Long Island have announced a strategic alliance that allows a number of historic vehicles on display in Danbury to be transferred on long term loan to the New York not-for-profit institution. The agreement was celebrated today as a rare World War M18 tank destroyer was unloaded at the Museum of American Armor inside Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

      Gary Lewi, a vice president and board member of the Museum of American Armor (MAA) stated, “First and foremost is the question how do both institutions pay tribute to John Valluzo, the late founder and president of what was the Military Museum of Southern New England (MMSNE) who sought to create a vibrant and dynamic tribute to the American G.I. Our Long Island institution shares a parallel mission and we do so within one of the largest veterans populations in the United States so there are obvious synergies that both museums sought to explore.”

      M18 hellcat arrival

      Sustaining a legacy

      Al Barto, a board member of the Connecticut based military museum observed, “There is little question that our institution has fallen on hard times since John’s death. He was a veteran, a visionary and the driving spirit behind the museum – and it is becoming apparent that he was truly the indispensable man. This long term agreement allows his legacy to be on public display in a vibrant institution.”

      Lewi stated, “U.S. Military Museum has a number of the tanks and other vehicles that are historically significant and should be seen by the public and their importance appreciated. The Museum of American Armor will continue to welcome elements of the collection as we have the venue adjacent to a major highway (the Long Island Expressway), the population density and a considerable media market required to achieve the strategic objectives of both institutions.”

      In cooperation with Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, the Museum of American Armor has under 25,000 square feet of space some 30 operational military vehicles that include a Sherman tank, a Stuart tank, an extremely rare Long Tom artillery piece, an M48 tank that was used by the Israeli army during the fierce 1973 Yom Kippur War, among other vehicles. Located within a Nassau County preserve the museum has used some 200 adjacent acres to stage living history presentations attracting thousands of people.

      Founded by Lawrence Kadish who serves as its president, the museum board includes former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Dr. Calvin Butts, president of the State University of New York at Old Westbury, Steve Napolitano, president and CEO of First Nationwide Title, and Michael Polimeni, CEO of Polimeni International, among others.

    • Marine Corps to Be Honored

      Marine Corps to Be Honored

      Marine Corps to be honored in presentation of rare amphibious assault vehicle to the Museum of American Armor in memory of Kevin Kronlund

      The Museum of American Armor in New York www.museumofamericanarmor.org is acquiring a rare World War II era LVT (Landing Vehicle Tracked) “Buffalo” amphibious assault vehicle from Thea Kronlund as part of a joint decision to create a permanent living tribute to her late husband and armor collector, Mr. Kevin Kronlund and his leadership in keeping alive our nation’s military heritage.

      Mrs. Kronlund stated, “On the eve of Kevin’s death the Museum of American Armor acquired his Long Tom cannon and M 4 artillery tractor for the purpose of making it a cornerstone of the museum’s armor collection on Long Island. Over the passage of time the museum has made repeated references to Kevin’s legacy when visitors come to tour their facility.  Given that the museum is located within one of the largest veterans populations in the United States and some 35 miles from Manhattan, we thought his LVT would be an appropriate means to create a lasting tribute to Kevin’s legacy that would be appreciated by many.”

      Bayou Amphibious Assault Vehicle

      Honoring a quiet patriot

      Museum vice president Gary Lewi said, “We are deeply honored to be thought of by Thea as the future home for this unique weapon of war that brought tens of thousands of Marines to hostile beaches across the Pacific. At the time of Kevin’s tragic death he had already earned a national reputation as a quiet patriot who shared his love of our nation’s military with anyone fortunate enough to meet him. Equally lasting was his offer of insight, expertise and unique skills in keeping these 70 year old vehicles operational. We can try to repay that debt by memorializing the man and his mission through this LVT.”

      Weighing over 16 tons, the amphibious vehicle being donated is similar to those first used by the U.S. Marines to assault the well-entrenched Japanese enemy in the Pacific on the island of Tarawa in late 1943. Of 125 vehicles used, only 35 remained operational by the end of the day, underscoring the fierce and bloody fighting that took place. Nevertheless, it became obvious to American planners that these armor vehicles, nicknamed Buffalos, had a vital role to play in bringing Marines ashore under fire across the Pacific. Future versions would be upgraded with more armor, machine guns and even tank turrets. In all, over 18,000 were built and are 26 feet long and nearly 11 feet wide.

      Formal dedication this summer

      The vehicle will be formally dedicated on August 6th, the 70th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima that set the stage for the Japanese surrender. Had Imperial Japan fought on thousands of LVTs would have been forced to come ashore under murderous fire from Kamikazes resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Marines and untold Japanese military and civilian casualties.

      Lewi said the museum’s intent is to use the LVT as the centerpiece for a permanent display that honors Kevin Kronlund and the Marines who took the Buffalo into battle. “I think that Kevin would have liked the idea that his operational vehicle will be used to greet every Leatherneck and his family who visits the museum. It is very much part of Marine Corps history and Kevin played an instrumental role as a custodian of that historic chapter.”

      While still capable of amphibious operation it is not the current intent of the museum to use the Buffalo off Long Island beaches.

    • Russian Federation’s Rep to Keynote Ceremony

      Russian Federation’s Rep to Keynote Ceremony

      Russian Federation’s Acting Military Attaché to keynote ceremony marking the 70th anniversary of the linkup of Soviet and American forces fighting the Nazi Reich during April 25th program at the Museum of American Armor

      Russian federation soldiers shaking hands atop MountainOn Saturday, April 25th at 11:00 a.m., the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, New York will observe the 70th anniversary of the historic World War II linkup between Soviet and American military forces fighting the Nazi Reich along the River Elbe inside Germany.

      Colonel Maxim V. Bykov, the Russian Federation’s Acting Defense Attaché posted in their Washington Embassy, will offer the keynote address during which time World War II Soviet and American veterans will be present, a recreation of the linkup will be staged by living historians, and prayers will be said for those who lost their lives during World War II.

      The armor museum will note that this anniversary program is believed to be the only one of its kind in the United States and, while it being conducted at a time when relations between the United States and today’s Russia are marked by disagreements and diplomatic disputes; when the future of the world literally hung in the balance, the United States and the Soviet Union stood as one against a foe of unimaginable evil.

      The Museum of American Armor sits within a multi-million dollar 25,000 square foot building inside Nassau County’s Old Bethpage Village Restoration. It presents some 30 operational military vehicles that periodically take to the woods and paths of the adjacent park, replicating Europe, 1944.

    • Calvin O’ Butts Appointed to Board

      Calvin O’ Butts Appointed to Board

      Rev-Dr-Calvin-O-Butts-III-Headshot

      Museum of American Armor announces The Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III has been appointed to its Board

      President and founder of the Museum of American Armor, Lawrence Kadish, today announced that the Reverend Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, President of SUNY College at Old Westbury and Pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, has agreed to serve on the board of the armor museum as the institution becomes a compelling educational destination that tells the story of our collective American experience in defending freedom.

       “I am honored to be involved in a museum that not only seeks to acknowledge the heroes in our own families but to also broaden our understanding of how America’s military became an important weapon in our battle to dismantle segregation, confront prejudice and defeat racism here at home,” stated Dr. Butts.

       New York State Regent Roger Tilles stated, “Congratulations to the armor museum for getting the services of the distinguished Calvin Butts on their Board of Trustees. It makes sense for this great educational institution to bring on a man who has been a paragon of educating young people for so many years. His ability to inspire and lead will fit well with one of Long Island’s premier educational institutions.”

      “Among those welcoming the announcement was a delegation who recently toured the museum during Black History Month; Brig. General George A. Jones (Ret.) Babylon Town Councilwoman Jackie Gordon, who serves as a Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, Korean War veteran William Porter, Jr., and Army Sergeant Jessie Bell.

      “I know I echo the thoughts of many veterans throughout the region when I say that the arrival of Dr. Butts to the museum’s board brings additional depth to its role as an education destination for families who need to better appreciate the role of all Americans in the defense of our freedoms,” stated Councilwoman Gordon.

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today as we face current threats.

    • Stop & Shop to Honor Region’s Veterans

      Stop & Shop to Honor Region’s Veterans

      Stop & Shop to honor the region’s veterans and active duty military on the 70th anniversary of World War II’s final battles

      Memorial Day tributes are among the programs to be sponsored

      Purchase, NY (February 27, 2015) – As we observe the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II this year, The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC has announced that the company will be honoring New York area veterans and those returned from active duty at events scheduled throughout the year at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport and the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

      Long Island hosts one of the largest veteran’s populations in the United States with approximately 210,000 men and women living in the bi-county area who have worn the uniform of the American military. “Stop & Shop is proud to support our local communities around issues that are meaningful to them, to support the American Airpower Museum, which is a local treasure, and veterans of today and yesterday who continue to protect our freedoms,” said Arlene Putterman, Manager of Public and Community Relations for Stop & Shop New York Metro division. Stop & Shop will be among the sponsors supporting the arrival of the Thunderbirds aerobatic team scheduled to fly over Jones Beach this Memorial Day weekend along with a squadron of World War II fighters and bombers including the iconic B-17 Flying Fortress.

      In addition, Stop & Shop will be underwriting 70th anniversary programs at the Museum of American Armor on the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration this spring that include a tribute to those who liberated the death camps of the Nazi Third Reich and Marines who stormed enemy held Pacific beaches.

      A longtime supporter of the Museum of American Armor, Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano stated, “Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano stated, “Stop & Shop’s sponsorship of these programs provides another opportunity to pay tribute to the heroes in our own families.  Their support helps ensure we all are afforded an opportunity to honor those who have risked their lives on behalf of our nation.”

      New York State Assemblyman Charles Lavine observed, “We have learned through much heartache and sacrifice that democracies must be strong enough to defend the very principle of freedom. These sponsorships by Stop & Shop are not only timely but crucial if we are to remain focused on what has been required to protect our nation.”

      Jeff Clyman of the American Airpower Museum said, “We hope the families of every vet join us in tipping our hats to Stop & Shop for providing the financial resources needed to create the programs that publicly thank our military. These are the kind of efforts that remind all of us that whether it was 70 years ago or today, freedom demands courage, valor and sacrifice.”

      About Stop & Shop

      The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC employs over 59,000 associates and operates 395 stores throughout Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey. The company helps support local communities fight hunger, combat childhood cancer and promote general health and wellness – with emphasis on children’s educational and support programs. In its commitment to be a sustainable company, Stop & Shop is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council and EPA’s Smart Way program and has been recognized by the EPA for the superior energy management of its stores. Stop & Shop is an Ahold company. To learn more about Stop & Shop, visit stopandshop.com or facebook.com/stopandshop.

       

      Stop & Shop’s Arlene Putterman is surrounded by WW II living historians at the Museum of American Armor

      Stop & Shop’s Arlene Putterman is surrounded by WWII living historians at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration as she announces the supermarket’s sponsorship of Memorial Day weekend events on Long Island this year that mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. She is joined by (left-to-right) Jake Dillon of Syosset, Michael Scarabino of Huntington, Stacy Wasson of Bellmore, Joe Nappi of Lake Ronkonkoma and Paul Randazzo of Oceanside.

       

      Contact:

      Arlene Putterman

      Stop & Shop New York Metro Division

      (914) 251-2834

      arlene.putterman@stopandshop.com

       

    • New Museum Board Appointee

      New Museum Board Appointee

      CLuccaBlackPresident and founder of the Museum of American Armor, Lawrence Kadish, today announced that Carolynn Lucca-Black has been appointed to serve on the museum’s board. She joins former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Ed Blumenfeld of BDG, Ltd., Michael Polimeni of Polimeni International, Frederick Daum of PSEG, Michael Sapraicone of Squad Security and Steve Napolitano of First Nationwide Title in supporting the museum and its mission of honoring our American veterans and those still on active duty.

      Ms. Lucca-Black began her career in banking some 15 years ago when she left Deloitte and Touche. By 2005, she joined Signature Bank as an Associate Group Director on the Melville team. Carolynn is a graduate of Fairfield University where she received a BS in Accounting. In addition to her recent appointment to the Board of the Museum of American Armor she is also on the Board of Regents for Tomorrow’s Hope Foundation and is the Treasurer for Healthy Directions, a not-for-profit that focuses on childhood obesity in inner cities.

      “We are a nation that too often forgets the heroes who live among us; the veterans who have served and those who defend our nation during this ongoing War on Terror. I am proud to be associated with a museum whose mission is so closely aligned with my personal belief that we have a moral responsibility to not only honor these men and women but to educate a new generation of Americans about what these soldiers, sailors and airmen and women have done on our behalf,” stated Ms. Lucca-Black.

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today as we face the ongoing threats from terrorists. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers over seventy years ago.

      It is open Wednesday through Sunday, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10, adults; $7, children 5 – 12 (under 5 admitted free); and $7 for seniors, volunteer firefighters and veterans. Admission provides visitors with access to both the armor museum and the adjacent Old Bethpage Village Restoration. More information can be found at www.museumofamericanarmor.org and on Facebook.

    • Battle of the Bulge Vets to Be Honored

      Battle of the Bulge Vets to Be Honored

      WWII enactor helping WWII elderly veteranOn the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, Americans who fought against all odds and veterans of that savage battle that cost the lives of 19,000 G.I.s to be honored at Museum of American Armor

      On Sunday, December 14, at 2:00 p.m., military veterans who withstood the savage World War II German counteroffensive known as the Battle of Bulge some 70 years ago this month will be honored at the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, surrounded by the tanks and armored cars similar to those that defended the G.I’s during the surprise attack.

      Some 19,000 American soldiers were killed by Nazi forces before the Germans were thrown back and ultimately defeated during World War II. Another 70,000 were injured or wounded. It was one of the most bitter and dearly won victories secured by American troops in Europe and yet few know of the courage and sacrifice required by those who defeated tens of thousands of enemy troops. On this important anniversary their valor will be honored and their heroic defense remembered.

      Some half a dozen veterans of the battle will be joined by Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and Assemblyman Charles Lavine as well as those recently returned from deployment.

      What: In tribute to the 19,000 Americans who fell during the Battle of the Bulge and the 70,000 injured, veterans who survived the Battle of the Bulge to be honored.

      Who: Battle of the Bulge defenders joined by elected officials and clergy, living historians and period armor

      When: Sunday, December 14, at 2:00 p.m.

      Where: Museum of American Armor, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

    • Security Expert Joins Museum Board

      Security Expert Joins Museum Board

      (Old Bethpage, New York) The Museum of American Armor has named Michael D. Sapraicone as the latest member of its board, joining museum President and founder Lawrence Kadish, former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Edward Blumenfeld of BDG, Ltd., Michael Polimeni of Polimeni International, Steve Napolitano of First Nationwide Title, Frederick Daum of PSEG and Gary Lewi of Rubenstein Associates.
      Mr. Sapraicone is President of Squad Security and Director of their New York, California, Illinois and international offices.
      A former First Grade NYPD Detective and frequent criminal justice commentator for media network TV and cable news programs, he is the founder and owner of Squad Security Inc. and Squad Security LTD worldwide companies which provide security solutions for many Fortune 500 companies ranging from Wall Street firms to international retailers.

      “I am proud and honored to be associated with this museum. It is a powerful and dynamic tribute to the citizen soldiers who have defended our nation and who continue to put themselves in harm’s way,” stated Sapraicone. “At a time when too much of our nation’s history is being discarded or ignored, this armor museum is well on its way to becoming a compelling classroom for every visitor. I look forward to supporting it IN any way I can.”

      Sapraicone is a member of the Company of Security Professionals of the United Kingdom, the National Association of Chiefs of Police, Associated Licensed Detectives of New York State and the American Academy for Professional Law Enforcement and ASIS International. He has also served as a member and chairman of the Board of Trustees of Holy Cross High School in Flushing, NY and is active in various philanthropic efforts. He also served on the Seaford School District School Board. The father of five, he is married to Eileen Sapraicone, an attorney and former Assistant District Attorney in New York City. She also serves AS pro bono counsel to the Museum of American Armor.

      Board member Steve Napolitano stated, “Michael is an extraordinary addition to the armor museum board. He has been enormously successful in supporting not for profit causes that he cares passionately about and he brings that energy and commitment to this crusade meant to keep our nation’s history alive and relevant before a new generation.”

      Operational vehicles now on display at the Museum of American Armor include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns, a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral, to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks.

      Beyond World War II programs, tribute programs are being scheduled to honor the American service men and women who have served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Iraq, Afghanistan and the War on Terror so that the museum is able to fulfill its mission of honoring America’s defense of freedom throughout the decades.

       

      Museum board members - Michael Sapraicone, Lawrence Kadish, Steve Napolitano, Mark Renton

      The latest museum board member of the Museum of American Armor, Michael Sapraicone (2nd from left) is joined by museum president and founder Lawrence Kadish, (3rd from left) board member Steve Napolitano and museum director Mark Renton (far left).

    • Rolling Out the Heavy Guns in Honor of Veterans Day

      Rolling Out the Heavy Guns in Honor of Veterans Day

      Veterans Day Weekend 2014 rolls out the heavy guns at the Museum of American Armor

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will be observing “Veterans Day Weekend” on November 8th and 9th between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. by rolling out its heavy artillery, the only 155 mm Long Tom cannon on public display in the northeast where it will be pulled by an equally rare artillery tractor that moved the guns to the front lines during World War II. Also making appearances will be anti-aircraft batteries, anti-tank cannon and more.

      Military tanker along with Heavy artillery gun

      In addition, the powerful cannon will be followed in the museum’s Veterans Weekend armor parade by the iconic Sherman tank similar to the armor that appeared in the Brad Pitt movie “Fury” which seeks to portray the intensity of combat in the closing days of World War II.

      The museum is asking any veterans with artillery experience to arrive during the weekend willing to offer video testimony on what it was like to “serve the guns” and the role they played in either World War II, Korea or Vietnam. “The Sherman tank may capture the public’s attention but artillery is often the deciding factor in winning battles. This year we seek to focus on that role and the men who served in the artillery,” stated museum director Mark Renton.

      Operational vehicles now on display at the Museum of American Armor include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns, a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral, to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks.

      Beyond World War II programs, tribute efforts are being scheduled to honor the American service men and women who have served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Iraq, Afghanistan and the War on Terror so that the museum is able to fulfill its mission of honoring America’s defense of freedom throughout the decades.

      The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 AM to 4 PM. Admission is $10, adults; $7, children 5 – 12 (under 5 are free); and $7, seniors, volunteer firefighters and veterans. Admission to the armor museum also allows you access to Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

    • Museum Offers Nassau Boy Scouts Scholarship Opportunity

      Museum Offers Nassau Boy Scouts Scholarship Opportunity

      Museum of American Armor offers Nassau County Boy Scouts a $10,000 scholarship challenge

      The Museum of American Armor today announced an essay program with the Theodore Roosevelt Council of the Boy Scouts of America designed to create a better understanding of the heroes within our own families and those throughout our communities with as much as $10,000 in scholarship awards to be presented to the selected winners.

      The Council serves thousands of youngsters throughout Nassau County, and the museum is challenging the scouts to write and submit an essay that relates to the military experiences of members of their own families, neighbors or members of their local veterans organization.  Three winners will be chosen from the entries received.

      Museum president and founder, Lawrence Kadish, stated, “The Boy Scouts have a nearly century old tradition of providing educational programs for boys and young men for the purpose of building character and to provide them with the foundation to be a full, participating partner in our democracy. What better way to assist that goal than to provide the means of reflecting on those who have defended our nation and those Americans who continue to do so.”

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano, a recent honoree of the Theodore Roosevelt Council of the Boy Scouts of America, endorsed the effort noting, “Within a mere handful of months, The Museum of American Armor has already become a powerful destination that honors those who have worn the uniform of our country’s military. Equally important, it has become a compelling educational center that presents a new generation of Americans with a much needed history lesson. I am delighted with this emerging partnership between the Scouts and the armor museum.”

      Mr. Kadish stated that $10,000 in scholarship dollars will be distributed to selected winners with first prize being $5,000, second prize, $3,000, third prize, $2,000 and a half a dozen honorable mentions being offered opportunities to climb aboard period operational armor at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

      Jay Garee, Scout Executive for the Theodore Roosevelt Council, stated, “We are honored to participate in this program and envision this being the first in a series of exciting opportunities for both our scouts and the museum. There is no question that the Museum of American Armor has quickly become an important educational resource for every visitor, and our scouts can play an important role in contributing to that goal.”

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers some seventy years ago. It is open Wednesday through Sunday, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

       

      MOAA-WW-2-Encampment with Edward Mangano in a real WWII Scout Car

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano inspects a recent museum event from a WWII scout car.

    • Military Timeline Weekend to Be Held

      Military Timeline Weekend to Be Held

      Military Timeline Event with Riders on Horseback with tank and a dog leading the way.The weekend of October 11th and 12th will feature history throughout the ages in one afternoon at the Museum of American Armor at Nassau County’s Old Bethpage Village Restoration when living historians present uniforms, weapons and tactics that include Roman gladiators, Revolutionary War minutemen, WWI doughboys, a world class display of WWII armor and Vietnam War GIs.

      The military heritage encampment is an extraordinary gathering of world history presented in one venue during one weekend when visitors can get an up close and personal look at the forces that have shaped our world. Interactive displays, rumbling tanks and knowledgeable living historians create a powerful family experience.

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano noted, “Endorsed by the Long Island Social Studies Council and applauded by the History Channel, Military Timeline Weekend has become a powerful history lesson for students who seek to better appreciate the heroes in their own families as well as the world we live in today. This event has become a compelling destination for families throughout the tri-state area and I would hope people make the time to come and see history literally take the field at the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration.”

      Gates are open between 10 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Adult admission is $10, with discounts for veterans and seniors, and $5 for children.

      The Museum of American Armor is part of the Military Heritage Coalition that includes the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport, the Cradle of Aviation and the Collings Foundation.

    • Israeli Tank to Be Dedicated

      Israeli Tank to Be Dedicated

      m48 Israeli tank on site in American Museum of Armor warehouseAn Israeli tank, a combat veteran of the `73 Yom Kippur War that threatened Israeli’s survival, will be dedicated at the Museum of American Armor on the eve of the Jewish high holidays

      On the eve of the Jewish high holidays an Israeli M48 tank that defended the State of Israel during the dark days of the 1973 Yom Kippur War will be dedicated on Tuesday, September 23rd at 2:00 p.m. at the Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage, Long Island.
      Among those participating in the dedication program will be Congressman Steve Israel, Consul General of Israel in New York Ambassador Ido Aharoni, combat veterans of the Israeli Defense Forces, Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano and Assemblyman Charles Lavine.

      This tank was built by the U.S and transferred to Jordan in the 1960s. Captured by the Israelis in the 1967 Arab-Israeli conflict it was then deployed during the devastating `73 Yom Kippur conflict when Egyptian forces attacked along the Suez Canal. This particular vehicle crossed the Canal and succeeded in attacking Arab forces from the rear before it was knocked out and left in Egypt. It was eventually purchased by a collector who brought it to the United States before being acquired by a philanthropist for display at the Museum of American Armor to remind visitors of the sacrifices often demanded in the defense of democracy.

      The Museum of American Armor enjoys an alliance with the American Airpower Museum, the Cradle of Aviation and Collings Foundation.

      What: Dedication of Israeli tank that helped save Israel during the desperate days of the `73 Yom Kippur War

      When: Eve of Jewish high holidays, Tuesday, September 23rd at 2:00 p.m.

      Where: Museum of American Armor, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage Village Restoration

      Who: Congressman Steve Israel, Consul General of Israel in New York Ambassador Ido Aharoni, County Executive Mangano, Assemblyman Lavine and an IDF military reservist

    • British Armored Car Acquired by Museum

      British Armored Car Acquired by Museum

      CVR fox drivers on flightlineBritish armored car latest acquisition for Museum of American Armor

      Credits Khaki Corps Imports for its skill in acquiring and supporting the historic vehicle

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, Old Bethpage, New York has acquired a British CVR(W) Fox armored reconnaissance vehicle from Khaki Corps Imports (KCI) of Tulsa, Oklahoma, http://www.khakicorpsimports.com/ as part of its mission to display operational military vehicles that have defended democracy and freedom. This marks the second military vehicle the museum has acquired through KCI.

      Museum director Mark Renton stated, “There are any number of options in purchasing period military vehicles but we look for a trusted company that can support the vehicle long after the purchase has been completed. Having already purchased a Ferret armored car from the company, Khaki Corps was the obvious choice.”

      The recently acquired Fox was deployed by the British in the mid-1970s for the purpose of supporting armored and mechanized infantry units. With its crew of three, its 6 cylinder gasoline powered Jaguar engine gave the Fox a surprising top speed of 64 miles per hour. It was armed with a 30 mm cannon and a coaxial machine gun. Its unique design included a low profile rotating turret and aluminum armor. Operationally, it was meant to outflank far heavier armored units, acting as a scout and a weapons platform that could engage light vehicles.

      Pat Eagan, president and founder of Khaki Corps Imports stated, “We are proud of our work supporting the efforts of The Museum of American Armor in New York and our broader role of providing demilled, certified military armor to clients across the United States. Each vehicle has an important story to tell and we recognize that it’s not just about the sale but our ability to provide technical support to ensure these vehicles continue to roll for many years to come.”

      For over fifteen years KCI has been a licensed importer of foreign military vehicles and equipment into the United States, specializing in British military vehicles, i.e., Land Rovers, armored personnel carriers, scout cars, self propelled guns and tanks. They also have a substantial inventory of British armored vehicle spare parts. KCI sales include vehicles and spares that are in stock as well as sales on an order basis.

    • New Appointment to Board of Trustees

      New Appointment to Board of Trustees

      Fred Daum greets driver of tank in Museum of American Armor warehouseMuseum of American Armor announces the appointment of Fred Daum to its board

      From a family that served, the need to salute their sacrifices

      Frederick G. Daum has been appointed to the board of trustees of the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration. A director at PSEG Long Island, Daum has enjoyed a long and comprehensive career with the region’s utility, having started in its natural gas distribution and service department and now leads PSEG Long Island’s customer support effort.

      “I am truly privileged to be part of a museum that is entrusted with a presenting an important chapter in our nation’s history,” stated Daum. “My grandfather was on the destroyer, USS Bristol, during World War II and my father served in the Marine Corps during the early 1960s, so I know from personal family experience that we have much to be thankful as we honor the men and women who have worn the uniform.”

      Daum holds an MBA from St. Joseph’s University Executive MBA program – Erivan K. Haub School of Business and received a BA from Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he was also a member of the Phi Omega Epsilon Honor Society.

      “I have served as an Adjunct Professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University and I believe the museum’s educational role as a destination for school groups, class visits and individual students cannot be understated. I look forward to assisting this aspect of the museum’s mission in the months and years to come,” Daum continued

      Daum joins others on the board including museum President and founder, Lawrence Kadish, former New York City Police Commissioner and Marine veteran Ray Kelly, BDG Ltd. president Edward Blumenfeld, Polimeni International CEO Michael Polimeni, President and CEO of First Nationwide Title Agency Steve Napolitano, among others.

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today as we face the ongoing War on Terror. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers over seventy years ago.

    • Armor to Visit American Airpower Museum

      Armor to Visit American Airpower Museum

      Man on assault vehicle in front of a jet with shark teeth on noseLabor Day weekend has Armor visiting Airpower Museum

      While offering flight experiences in World War II fighters and bombers, the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport will be welcoming an armored column from the Museum of American Armor during Airpower ceremonies that pay tribute to the nearly 50,000 people who once reported to work at Grumman and Republic Aviation.

      Throughout the weekend historic aircraft will be offering flight experiences as well including a B-17 Flying Fortress, a B-24 Liberator bomber, a rare two seat P-51 Mustang, a C-47 D-Day Airborne transport and other aircraft that help tell the story of America’s work force when it was at the heart of the Arsenal of Democracy. Armored vehicles including the M8 Greyhound and the M20 general command car from the Museum of American Armor will be in motion, living historians will present displays and flyby will be conducted that honors those Americans still on active duty.

      The Museum of American Armor invites its visitors and friends to visit Airpower when gates are open Friday, August 29th through Monday, September 1st between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Airpower admission is $15 adults, $10 seniors over 65 and veterans, $7 children 4-12.

    • Rare Dragon Wagon on Display

      Rare Dragon Wagon on Display

      M25A1 - Dragon WagonRare tank transporter now on display at Museum of American Armor

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration has announced the arrival of a World War II era “Dragon Wagon,” a rare tank transporter whose massive 40 ton bulk enabled it to quickly bring armor reinforcements to the front line while extracting damaged tanks for repair and a prompt return to combat.

      The rare vehicle is operational and is part of the David Levy armor collection, complementing the other World War II tanks, armored cars and weapons on display at the Museum of American Armor. Its presentation serves to highlight the logistics genius of America’s Arsenal of Democracy where a constant flow of men, supplies and weapons of war arrived from the United States during World War II and then was quickly put into the field to overwhelm, outflank and overpower the enemy.

      The M25A1 used a 240 horsepower engine and a 12 speed transmission to move at speeds of up to 26 miles per hour in transporting Sherman tanks and other vehicles to the front lines. Over 1,500 were built by Pacific Car and Foundry Company during World War II but only a handful remain in existence today.

      Museum Director Mark Renton stated, “Vintage newsreels rightly focus on the men in the front lines facing combat, but for every soldier in the field there were 15 behind him providing the G.I. with everything from bullets and food to tactical intelligence and replacement equipment. The Dragon Wagon reminds us that World War II was a war of logistics and maneuver and it allows us to honor those who ensured we would win that conflict.”

      Opened in cooperation with Nassau County and County Executive Edward P. Mangano, The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is a living tribute to every American who has worn the uniform and those who continue to defend our nation today. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers some seventy years ago.

      It is open Wednesday through Sunday, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10, adults; $7, children 5 – 12 (under 5 admitted free); and $7 for seniors, volunteer firefighters and veterans. Admission provides visitors with access to both the armor museum and the adjacent Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

    • Museum of American Armor Dedicates

      Museum of American Armor Dedicates

      Public-private partnership empowers heritage tourism as armor column rolls

      As the nation observes the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the Museum of American Armor has dedicated its new $5 million home on the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, where it will present more than 25 operational armored vehicles within the context of telling the story of the American soldier.

      Welcoming D-Day veterans and those military personnel recently returned from deployment, Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano was joined by Congressman Peter King, co-Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, Museum founder Lawrence Kadish, former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, History Channel’s Chief Historian and Vice President Dr. Libby O’Connell and British Deputy Consul General Nick Astbury among others.

      The museum is the result of a unique public private partnership that will allow Nassau County to access the powerful interest visitors have in the legacy of World War II, generate new revenue for the restoration village and create a permanent living classroom for a new generation of Americans presented with the story of battlefield sacrifices made on their behalf.

      Mr. Kadish stated, “WW II will continue to fascinate current and future generations because the stark depiction of good versus evil is so dramatic. In addition, everyone has someone in their family’s history who fought in that war, survived the carnage or was lost during that conflict.  It also reminds us that the current War on Terror still demands American courage in the face of relentless evil.”

      Nassau County Executive Mangano observed, “The ability to create an armored column that replicates the sights and sounds of American forces during World War II is one of the most compelling educational tools we have to recount the story of our GIs’ courage, valor and sacrifice. Place it in this setting of vintage farmhouses and country roads so reminiscent of the WWII era Normandy countryside, and you have created a virtual time machine that ensures indelible memories for families.”

      Congressman Peter King thanked the museum’s founder and president, stating, “Through the creation of this museum, Lawrence Kadish has ensured that we will have a better appreciation of our citizen soldiers and the role they continue to play in the defense of freedom. His considerable financial contribution to this new institution is staggering, but it reflects the depth of his commitment to tell the story of each and every one of us.

      “We will be forever in his debt for creating a living, vibrant, tribute to our military – one that will also remind us that each one of us has an individual responsibility to `stand watch’ in a very dangerous world,” King concluded.

       

      An economic multiplier

      In recognition of the economic power of heritage tourism, the Cuomo Administration, New York State Senator Dean Skelos and Assemblyman Charles Lavine have directed some $1.6 million towards the museum’s construction.

      In a joint statement, Senator Skelos and Assemblyman Lavine explained, “In addition to the power of this museum to pay tribute to the American soldier, it is also an economic generator that strengthens our tourism destination industry, a growing factor in our local economy. The rate of return for the taxpayer will be significant as the armor museum attracts national and international visitors to its operational collection.”

      Chief Historian for the History Channel Dr. Libby O’Connell agreed, “This announcement marks a unique commitment by public and private sectors to preserve and present a seminal chapter in the history of our nation… and our world. It also reflects a commitment to apply a variety of innovative resources to the task of funding the preservation of our history and serves as a national model for similar efforts.”

      Heritage tourism has become a significant sector across the country, and Nassau County has an opportunity to grow its share of the market through this effort without cost to the taxpayer. A national survey found that heritage travelers who seek to connect with America’s past spend an average of $994 per trip compared to only $611 for other leisure travelers. The study also found heritage travelers are more frequent travelers, reporting an average of 5.01 leisure trips over a 12 month period versus 3.98 trips by non-heritage travelers. They prefer their leisure travel to be educational and they spend more on cultural and heritage activities. Finally, these individuals will travel farther to get the experiences they seek.

       

      Commissioner Kelly and Tanker Horowitz

      Museum Board member, former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly stated, “I am proud to be part of an organization that is not only paying tribute to every American who has worn the uniform, but is becoming a destination that will serve as a living, vibrant classroom that keeps alive the courage and valor of our American heritage.” In addition to Mr. Kadish, he is joined on the board by Ed Blumenfeld, Michael Polimeni, Steve Napolitano and Gary Lewi.

      Hy Horowitz of East Meadow, a Sherman tanker in General Patton’s 7th Armor Division, was among those who liberated the Buchenwald death camp. Horowitz said, “For the last six decades, veterans like me have been retelling the stories of valor and liberation so that, as Americans, we can understand what we did on behalf of humanity. It puts our country in perspective and it frames our place in the world. It is now time for a new generation to accept the responsibility of retelling that story so that the world is reminded that America stands for freedom, diversity and democracy.

      Horowitz observed, “Lawrence Kadish understands that need and put an enormous amount of money into a building that will house an extraordinary collection of old friends. But he knows it’s not about the armor – it’s about the people. Americans, all.  We have a story to tell and this place will ensure that it is heard. My story, and that of a generation, will be in good hands.”

       

      A collection of icons

      Operational vehicles that will be on public display include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns,  a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral, to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks.

       

      Beyond World War II programs, tributes will be created to the American service men and women who have served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Iraq, Afghanistan and the War on Terror so that the museum is able to fulfill its mission of honoring America’s defense of freedom throughout the decades.

    • Calling all D-Day Veterans

      Calling all D-Day Veterans

      This year’s 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II invasion of Nazi occupied France by Allied troops, has the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration and Bristal Assisted Living seeking all American veterans who served during that cataclysmic battle.

      Museum President and founder Lawrence Kadish explained, “When American and British forces came ashore under murderous machine gun fire, the fate of the Third Reich hung in the balance. By successfully opening a second front against the Nazis, even the German general staff knew the end was now just a matter of time. As we approach the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we have an obligation to remember and honor those Americans who were on the ground, on the sea or in the air.”

      The museum is inviting Normandy veterans to write an essay of any length or produce photos about their military experiences during that crucial chapter in world history.  In addition to being included in the museum’s Living History program, a panel of judges led by the museum’s “adjutant general” and former Nassau County District Court Principle Law Clerk Eileen Daly Sapraicone will select a dozen winning essays that will allow D-Day veterans and members of their families to climb aboard WW II armor for a “patrol” through the woods of Old Bethpage Village Restoration this summer through a program sponsored by Bristal Assisted Living.

      A principle of Bristal Assisted, Jan Burman, stated, “There remains a deeply troubling ignorance of our American heritage and how this nation, and in fact, democracy as we know it, was saved from the abyss of tyranny by a generation that went to war over 70 years ago. Today, it is nothing less than a moral imperative that we recognize their sacrifice and the fact that democracy and freedom remain at risk around the world. This program seeks to educate a new generation of Americans and appreciate the heroes in their homes.”

      Ms. Sapraicone explained, “This D-Day Remembrance Project is about protecting the future by honoring the past. We need to understand that there remain forces in this world that would welcome the opportunity to destroy everything we hold dear: freedom, democracy, diversity and tolerance. The destruction of the Nazi regime didn’t end evil in this world, and we owe it to the men who gave their lives on the beaches of France to defend liberty.”

      Veterans are asked to send their essay to the Museum of American Armor, care of Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Plainview, New York 11804 or through the museum’s website, www.museumofamericanarmor.org

       

      Walkers in front of Tank and Artillery Guns

      This year’s 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II invasion of Nazi occupied France by Allied troops, has the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration and Bristal Assisted Living seeking all Nassau County veterans who served during that cataclysmic battle. The museum is inviting Normandy veterans to write an essay of any length or produce photos about their military experiences during that crucial chapter in world history. A panel of judges led by the museum’s “adjutant general” and former Nassau County District Court Principle Law Clerk Eileen Daly Sapraicone (second from right) will select a dozen winning essays that will allow D-Day veterans and members of their families to climb aboard WWII armor for a “patrol” through the woods of Old Bethpage Village Restoration this summer through a program sponsored by Bristal Assisted Living. Here she is joined by living historians discussing the tactics of that crucial battle 70 years ago this summer. 

    • Ray Kelly Joins Museum Board

      Ray Kelly Joins Museum Board

      (Old Bethpage, N.Y) The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration Village today announced that former New York City Police Commissioner and Marine Corps veteran Ray Kelly is joining the museum’s Board of Trustees.

      Mr. Kelly was the longest serving Commissioner of the New York City Police Department in its history and rose from cadet to the department’s top job during his 47 years on the force. The Commissioner is a combat veteran of the Vietnam War. He led fellow Marines during the Vietnam War as a First Lieutenant including the bloody chaotic battles of Operation Harvest Moon that broke the back of a Viet Cong offensive south of Da Nang.  Upon returning home Commissioner Kelly joined the Marine Reserves and retired with the rank of Colonel.

      Commissioner Ray KellyCommissioner Kelly stated, “I am proud to be part of an organization that will not only pay tribute to every American who has worn the uniform, but is becoming a destination that will serve as a living, vibrant classroom that keeps alive the courage and valor of our American heritage.”

      Museum founder and president Lawrence Kadish said, “We are immensely proud that Commissioner Kelly has agreed to serve on the museum’s board. It underscores the importance of our mission of honoring the past for the purpose of paying tribute to the heroes in our own families as well as serving to remind us all that America continues to face a dangerous world. “

      Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano welcomed the announcement. “The Museum of American Armor could not have a better ally than Ray Kelly. His extraordinary tenure as New York City Police Commissioner reflects his professional integrity, his personal resolve and his quiet patriotism. His board position at the Armor museum will ensure this emerging destination in the New York metropolitan area will allow it to go from strength to strength. “

      Commissioner Kelly has also served as Director of Police under the United Nations Mission in Haiti, and as an Interpol Vice President. During the Clinton Administration, Kelly served as Treasury Department Under Secretary for Enforcement.  He is currently a commentator for ABC News on issues relating to terrorism and is president of risk management services at Cushman & Wakefield where the firm offers clients specifically designed solutions to manage and mitigate risks around the world.

      The Museum of American Armor www.museumofamericanarmor.org will be dedicating its 25,000 square foot building this June 6th within Old Bethpage Village Restoration through a public private partnership with Nassau County and the State of New York.  It reflects an effective multi-purposing of OBVR that has won the endorsement of the History Channel as it campaigns to preserve our nation’s history.

      At the recommendation of the County Executive, more than 25 operational WW II vehicles in the museum’s collection have the ability to create an armored column that replicates the environment faced by of American forces during World War II. Place the armor in a setting of vintage farmhouses and country roads reminiscent of the WWII era Normandy countryside, and one has walked into a virtual time machine that puts visitors in touch with American military history. While based in its new facility, armor will operate in the village setting several times a year in concert with living historians so that visitors can capture the sights and sounds of Europe in 1944.

    • Museum Director Named

      Museum Director Named

      Mark Renton in front of military vehicleDirector named at the Museum of American Armor slated to open in the spring

      The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration has named Mark Renton its director, placing him in charge of a multi-million dollar collection of operational armor from World War II. The museum is currently under construction and will open this spring, gathering its collection under one roof where it will pay tribute to the American G.I. of every era.

      Mr. Renton, a Massapequa resident, is a nationally recognized expert on the maintenance, repair and role of historic armor. Typically, his recent duties saw him replace a Sherman tank engine and return the vehicle to running order, restore a rare prewar U.S. Army scout car to operational condition and lead a public discussion on tank tactics during a World War II living history program.

      This past winter he has been the onsite liaison between the museum and Blumenfeld Development Group, (BDG) of Syosset, the company responsible for coordinating the multi-million dollar construction project. Despite this historically bitter winter, BDG has worked with Pratt Brothers and the construction trades to keep the project on schedule to ensure its opening prior to the 70th anniversary of the June 6th D-Day invasion of Nazi occupied Europe during World War II.

      “I am honored and humbled to be named as the museum’s director. I have been entrusted with much more than just priceless armor. I have been asked to protect icons that represent American courage and valor. It is a responsibility that goes far beyond a title, and I look forward to welcoming visitors seeking to know more about the heroes in their own families.”

      Lawrence Kadish is founder and president of the Museum of American Armor, a 501( C) 3 not-for-profit chartered by the New York State Board of Regents.

    • Battle of the Bulge Vets Remembered

      Battle of the Bulge Vets Remembered

      Americans who stood against all odds are paid tribute Battle of Bulge veterans and the 19,000 G.I.s lost are honored with flag raising at Museum of American Armor

      On a muddy, misty December morning, veterans, elected officials and living historians gathered at the construction site of the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration to pay tribute to the Americans who withstood a murderous assault by German ground and armor forces coming out of the Ardennes forest in 1944.

      History now calls it the Battle of the Bulge, belying the horrific casualties suffered by American forces with some 19,000 G.I’s killed and many more wounded. In the face of overwhelming firepower small groups of Americans with incredible courage delayed the German march on Antwerp while waiting for reinforcements who brought ultimate victory.

      As reporters gathered in the muddy park field three, World War II armored vehicles belonging to the museum rumbled from behind the trees and positioned themselves in front of the podium. A crane with the American flag flying from its steelwork rose in the air as aging veterans snapped a razor sharp salute at the command of veteran Jack Hayne.

      Battle of the Bulge veterans included William Mueller, president of the LI chapter of the Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge, Sy Bosworth and  Irving Greger , both of Plainview, and Angelo Pennestri of Bethpage. Greger was credited with knocking out a Panther tank, but he maintains it simply ran out of gasoline.

      Business, government and law gather to honor our vets

      Among those honoring the group were State Senator Charles Fuschillo and Assemblyman Chuck Lavine who braved bleak weather to shake the hands of the vets who attended, including a much later generation of G.I.s who served in Vietnam. Also joining them were leaders in law and business; Eileen Daly Sapraicone, Esq., who serves as the museum’s pro bono adjutant general, and Steve Napolitano, President and CEO of First Nationwide Title Agency.

      Museum President and founder  Lawrence Kadish stated, “When I was a kid growing up in Brooklyn during World War II, the worst thing that could happen would be the arrival of a telegram. Strong men would shake and mothers would weep before they even knew what was inside that envelope.  They knew – without being told a word – that a telegram in wartime was about death.

      “And not just any death – but of someone they knew and loved.

      “After the Battle of the Bulge there were a lot of telegrams. More than 19,000 of them.  That battle remains a part of World War II that few talk about today and fewer still understand it. Yet it was about a murderous Nazi counter attack and the raw courage of American G.I.s who withstood it.

      “While the Museum of American Armor is not yet completed, our mission has already begun – to honor all Americans who have worn the uniform and those who continue to protect us during the ongoing War on Terror,” he concluded.

      Mr. Mueller told FIOS One News, “I lost so many good friends who were in the service with me for such a long period of time. I know I was very lucky to survive that attack and we have an obligation to remember those who did not.”

      Napolitano, a resident of Rockville Centre, explained, “I chose to stand here with these veterans today because I know what they accomplished through courage and sacrifice in the snows of Belgium almost 70 years ago. My Dad was in Patton’s army and I believe everyone in America has a direct connection to the events of World War II. This armor museum will give us all better insight into that conflict and why we can never forget the lessons that generation continues to teach us.”

      Staggering losses, yet the line held

      Senator Fuschillo told the audience, “In weather far colder than this – in conditions that were lethal – unsuspecting American G.I.s found themselves the target of a massive counter offensive by the German Army in December 1944. Before the Germans were thrown back, nearly 19,000 American troops would die – the number remains staggering  —  but few Americans today appreciate what it took to hold the line and prevent the Germans from breaking through to the English Channel.

      Assemblyman Lavine agreed, “It is fitting and appropriate that we should gather here – on this bleak winter day – and offer our thanks to those who made sure that Hitler’s last desperate gamble was a failure.”

      Ms. Daly Sapraicone, of Upper Brookville, observed, “Standing with these veterans, one begins to understand the personal courage and sacrifice required by so many Americans who are asked to wear the uniform of our military. We have a responsibility to tell their story every day and embrace their legacy of freedom.”

      The Museum of American Armor is scheduled to open its doors in the spring of 2014 and will feature almost 30 operational armor vehicles.

    • Grant for Armor Museum Announced

      Grant for Armor Museum Announced

      Charles Lavine and Museum workers in front of tanksAs bulldozers start the task of clearing the land for the construction of the Museum of American Armor on the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration, New York State Assemblyman Charles Lavine has announced the awarding of a $250,000 state grant that will allow the museum to meet its infrastructure needs.

      Assemblyman Lavine stated, “In addition to the power of this museum to pay tribute to the American soldier, it is also an economic generator that strengthens our tourism destination industry, a growing factor in our local economy. The rate of return for the taxpayer will be significant as Armor attracts national and international visitors to its operational collection.”

      Michael Polimeni, a member of the Museum of American Armor’s Board of Directors, stated, “This grant will help ensure that we are able to achieve multiple goals: serve as an American military tribute, operate as an educational center and emerge as an economic asset for Nassau County and the region as a whole. We are deeply appreciative of the efforts of Assemblyman Lavine and his recognition that the Museum of American Armor will create economic value for our community while preserving our nation’s heritage.”

      The construction effort is being supervised by Blumenfeld Development Group. Cameron Engineering and Gaddis Architects are providing professional support. Gencon Construction Corporation is donating their labor to erect the building. Pratt Brothers has been selected to break ground and prepare the site for the steel and concrete to follow.

      The museum was founded by Lawrence Kadish whose $1,000,000 gift has enabled construction to begin. He stated, “In a 21st Century where digital fantasies and social networking too often obscure the harsh reality of the world from many of our young Americans, this museum is designed to remind them that prior generations not much older than they literally saved civilization.  It is also meant to focus our attention on the continuing War on Terror and the sacrifices made by a new generation of Americans.  It is meant to pay tribute to the past and remind us that the future is never guaranteed unless there are Americans willing to defend this nation.”

      The Visitor’s Experience

      Visitors will arrive at the park to find a museum complex that is separate and distinct from the nationally respected Restoration Village. As they approach the museum they will be welcomed by a design that incorporates the colors of our nation’s flag, an armor vehicle that helps define their experience and an operational collection that periodically departs the museum for field maneuvers.

      Permanent displays include a Wall of Honor that pays tribute to the men and women from the region who have worn our country’s uniform; exhibits that highlight unique military chapters in our nation’s history including the War on terror; and interactive displays that showcase the role of armor in defending our freedoms.

      Virtually all of the museum’s operational vehicles will be on public display including the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart light tank often deployed by the Marines during their WW II Pacific campaigns, a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks.

    • History Channel Provides Funding for Permanent Exhibit

      History Channel Provides Funding for Permanent Exhibit

      History Channel provides Armor Museum being built at Old Bethpage Village Restoration a $20,000 grant to create Bulletin! The story of America’s War Correspondents”

      Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano today announced that the Museum of American Armor now under construction at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, is the recipient a $20,000 “Save our History” grant from History for the purpose of creating a permanent exhibit entitled “Bulletin! The Story of America’s War Correspondents.”

      County Executive Mangano stated, “We are extremely grateful for this award from History which will allow the museum to tell the story of men and women under fire armed with little more than a typewriter, recorder or camera for the purpose of covering American courage in the defense of freedom.”

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chief Historian and a senior vice president at History explained, “Not only were we impressed that this exhibit will be within the context of a museum filled with operational American armor of World War II, but this permanent display will include profile pieces on the pioneering women journalists of that era who sought to cover the conflict. These women had to fight just for the opportunity to wear the patch `war correspondent’ on their uniforms and to get their stories into the paper.”

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chief Historian at the History Channel with a photo of WWII women war correspondents

      Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chief Historian at the History Channel with a photo of WWII women war correspondents

       

      Co-curator for the effort, Julia Lauria-Blum observed, “Most know the name Edward R. Murrow but very few know Dickey Chapelle, a woman photographer who managed to get to bloody Okinawa only to be told by a Marine general that she had no business being on the island. She stared him down and did her job.”

      The Museum of American Armor has quickly grown to become one of the most important armor collections on public display in the Northeast. Lawrence Kadish, founding Chairman of the Museum of American Armor, is providing a gift of $1,000,000 towards the creation of the museum and the New York State Economic Development Corporation has just matched that gift with a $1,000,000 grant that underscores its economic contribution to heritage tourism in the state.

      Kadish reminds, “Our goal is to bring the sights and sounds of American history to a new generation, and thereby pay tribute to those who continue to defend us during this ongoing War on Terror and those who have heroically defended our freedoms over the many decades.”

      The arrival of the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will enable a joint marketing program with the nearby American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport and Nassau County’s Cradle of Aviation Museum at Mitchel Field, Garden City.

      Plans call for the construction of a 25,000 square foot facility on the grounds of the Village. Operational vehicles that will be on public display include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart light tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns,  a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral to jeeps, weapons carriers and half-tracks.

      Special operational weekends are planned, during which World War II living historians will mount joint operations with the armor and take to the fields of Old Bethpage Village Restoration to demonstrate how these weapons were deployed. At other times, the armor will be displayed on the ramp at the American Airpower Museum or at parades and special events throughout the bi-county area.

      In addition, tributes will be created to the American service men and women who have served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Afghanistan and the War on Terror so that the museum is able to fulfill its mission of honoring America’s defense of freedom throughout the decades.

    • Wings, Wheels & Tracks Celebration to Be Held

      Wings, Wheels & Tracks Celebration to Be Held

      Tanks and Truck driving on flightline of AirshowMuseum of American Armor to roll out a tank convoy at the American Airpower Museum this Labor Day weekend

      Part of annual “Wings, Wheels and Tracks” celebration at Republic’s Airpower Museum

      This Labor Day weekend the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport will launch an unprecedented formation flight of historic B-25 Mitchell bombers and WWII escort fighters for a tribute flight over the World Trade Center while a tank convoy from the Museum of American Armor rolls down its taxiways.

      Throughout the upcoming holiday weekend, August 31st through September 2nd, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., historic armor will form a convoy that complements the aircraft on public display at Airpower’s Farmingdale facility along with a squadron of other World War II planes and vintage cars.  Flight experiences will also be available in a B-25 for a donation.

      The Museum of American Armor began with a modest display of military vehicles at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport in 2009 and quickly grew to become one of the most important armor collections on public display in the New York metropolitan area.

      The Museum is building a 25,000 square foot facility on the grounds of Old Bethpage Restoration Village this summer.  New additions to its extraordinary collection now include a 40 mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun, a classic Lasalle sedan of the late 1930s used as an Admiral’s staff car, a British Bren Gun carrier, a World War II era airfield fire truck and a British armored car.

    • Museum Video Wins Telly Awards Competition

      Museum Video Wins Telly Awards Competition

      Museum of American Armor video wins “Telly Awards” competition

      Creators Michael Mancusi and S. L. Kelley cited for their creative approach

      Following a national competition among outstanding regional television and cable commercials and programs two Long Island videographers have been presented with a “Telly Award” for their mini-documentary on the Museum of American Armor on Long Island.

      Michael Mancusi and S. L. Kelley were presented with a coveted Telly for their production of, “Museum of American Armor, A Museum on the Move.”  It features the museum’s operational collection of fully-restored World War II vehicles which evoke the heroism and nostalgia of an earlier era to bring history to life for new generations.  This video can be viewed at:  museumofamericanarmor.org.

      “We are deeply honored to be presented with this award but we were equally honored to be allowed to work with these armored vehicles, priceless icons of an era when our nation’s very survival was on the line. We know of the courage and valor required to field these weapons of war– my father drove a Sherman tank in Patton’s Army—so we found it a welcome challenge to convey that the lessons of WWII are still relevant today,” stated Ms. Kelley.

      “In addition to the judges who deliberated over our work we also want to thank the Museum of American Armor, and its president and founder, Lawrence Kadish, who inspired us to create this video and made it possible by restoring WWII era armor,” offered Mancusi.

      Founded in 1979, the Telly Awards is a widely known and highly respected national and international competition and receives over 12,000 entries annually from all 50 states and many foreign countries.   The Telly Awards showcases the best work of the most respected advertising agencies, production companies, television stations, cable operators, and corporate video departments in the world.

      “The Telly Awards has a mission to honor the very best in film and video,” said Linda Day, Executive Director of the Telly Awards.

      Michael Mancusi and S. L. Kelley are a New York/Florida-based creative team of video artists who have been honored for their work in numerous competitions such as the New York Festivals International TV & Film Awards and the U.S. International Film and Video Festival, among others.  They have garnered numerous Telly Awards since 1992, winning the Telly’s top honors for their video productions created for clients such as broadcast industry giants, Ikegami Electronics USA and Sennheiser USA.

      The team, which writes, shoots, produces and edits custom communications videos, has traveled the world producing promotional videos for tourism boards, embassies of countries and Fortune 500 companies, as well as documentaries, educational programs, and television commercial campaigns.

      They can be contacted at:  manqc@aol.com

       

    • Museum Names Pro Bono Adjutant General

      Museum Names Pro Bono Adjutant General

      The armor museum’s Eileen Daly-Sapraicone joins WWII living historians during the “field exercises” at Old Bethpage Village Restoration.WWII Armor Museum Names Seaford Resident

      As Its Pro Bono “Adjutant General”

      The armor museum’s Eileen Daly-Sapraicone joins WWII living historians during the “field exercises” at Old Bethpage Village Restoration.

      The Museum of American Armor has named Eileen Daly-Sapraicone, Esq. of Seaford, as pro bono “adjutant general” to the not-for-profit museum that will house a collection of thirty operational World War II tanks and vehicles when construction of its 25,000 square foot facility is completed at Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

      When the museum’s plans were announced last month Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano stated, “The ability to create an armored column that replicates the sights and sounds of American forces during World War II is one of the most compelling educational tools we have to recount the story of our GIs’ courage, valor and sacrifice. Place it in this setting of vintage farmhouses and country roads so reminiscent of the WWII era Normandy countryside, and you have created a virtual time machine that ensures indelible memories for families.”

      Ms. Daly-Sapraicone stated, “I am honored to be associated with this museum as its mission is meant to honor our veterans while serving as a powerful educational resource for a new generation of Americans. We have an obligation to ensure that the stories from this period are never allowed to fade and my volunteer efforts will be driven by that commitment.”

      Eileen is a law secretary in Nassau County District Court, previously served in the City of New York Department of Investigation and has worked as a Queens Assistant District Attorney. In her pro bono capacity she will not only assist in the governance of the 501 C 3 not-for-profit museum but will seek to reach out to Nassau County veterans as part of a larger effort by the museum to act as a venue for veterans outreach organizations and relevant government agencies.

      “The War on Terror has required the mobilization of thousands of Long Islanders who put on the uniform to defend our nation. The Museum of American Armor can act as a liaison to connect those veterans with service providers here to assist military families,” continued Ms. Daly-Sapraicone.

      The Museum of American Armor began with a modest display of military vehicles at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport in 2009 and quickly grew to become one of the most important armor collections on public display in the Northeast. It will continue to play an integral role at the American Airpower Museum, but will now have a dedicated location in which to display and operate all of its tanks, armored cars, jeeps and support equipment.

      Lawrence Kadish, founding Chairman of the Museum of American Armor, is providing a gift of $1,000,000 towards the creation of the museum. Plans call for the construction this summer of a 25,000 square foot facility on the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration. Operational vehicles that will be on public display include the iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart light tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns,  a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti-aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Plans are also underway to honor veterans of the Korean, Vietnam and Cold War conflicts as well as the War on Terror.

    • Museum to Aid County’s Tourism Industry

      Museum to Aid County’s Tourism Industry

      Press conference for expansion of Museum of American ArmorIn a move designed to further strengthen Nassau County’s tourism and the county’s destination tourism industry while providing a new source of revenue for the county’s park system, the Museum of American Armor will build a 25,000 square foot facility just inside the grounds of Old Bethpage Village Restoration on Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage.

      The ability of the museum to create a military armored column that replicates the sights and sounds of American forces during World War II offers one of the most compelling educational tools our region has in telling the seminal story of American courage, valor and sacrifice. Placing it in this unique setting of vintage farm houses and country roads creates a virtual time machine that ensures a powerful regional, national and international destination for visitors.

      This multipurpose effort of OBVR is also an unprecedented opportunity to expand the scope of the complex by creating a complimentary use and thereby reawakening public awareness, improving attendance and strengthening revenue for a county park system that has been hurt by the recession.

      Lawrence Kadish, Chairman and founder of the Museum of American Armor, stated, “Seeing these vehicles cross an open field as Airpower’s vintage fighters fly overhead recreates a moment in time that allows us to begin to appreciate what was required by our grandfathers to defeat an evil that even today we cannot fully comprehend. Our goal is to bring the sights and sounds of American history to a new generation and thereby pay tribute to those who defended our freedoms.”

      Visitors will walk through the museum’s camouflaged front doors that have been heavily sandbagged similar to the way important bunkers were protected some 70 years ago. Inside, a gift shop and administrative office will occupy a modest amount of space as the bulk of the building will be devoted to the display of some 30 vehicles. Half a dozen times a year, and in coordination with OBVR programming, these vehicles will be presented in the field or on the Village’s country roads as living historians offer displays on WWII tactics.

       History Channel Historian applauds expansion of history tourism

      Chief Historian for the History Channel, Dr. Libby O’Connell, observed, “This announcement marks a unique commitment by public and private sectors to preserve and present a seminal chapter in the history of our nation and our world. It also reflects a commitment to apply a variety of innovative resources to the task of funding the preservation of our history. By using complimentary periods within the same space, Nassau County has strategically enhanced the ability of Old Bethpage Village Restoration to be a stronger destination for local residents, tourists and those who live within the tri-state area.

      The arrival of the Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will allow for a joint marketing program with the nearby American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport and Nassau County’s Cradle of Aviation Museum at Mitchel Field, Garden City.

      Operational vehicles that will be on public display include an iconic Sherman tank, a Stuart light tank used extensively by the Marines during their Pacific campaigns,  a potent 155 mm howitzer, reconnaissance vehicles that acted as armored scouts for American forces, anti aircraft guns and similar weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II. Other vehicles range from a classic LaSalle staff car in the markings of a Fleet Admiral to jeeps, weapons carriers and half tracks. Multimedia displays will augment the display of vehicles and visitors will be able to see tanks under repair and restoration.

    • Liberation of Nazi Camps Memorialized

      Liberation of Nazi Camps Memorialized

      Rubenstein_Armor_Museum_photo-_thearumsteinpodiumLiberation Of The Nazi Death Camps Memorialized With Dedication Of American Armor That Helped Knock Down Their Gates

      On the 65th anniversary of the liberation of Nazi death camps, one of the American armored vehicles similar to those that broke down the gates and freed remaining survivors was dedicated by the Museum of American Armor during ceremonies at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport by survivors of the Holocaust and G.I. veterans who participated in the liberation.

      The M8 Greyhound armored car was acquired for the specific purpose of helping tell the story of the Holocaust from the point of view of the GIs who liberated the camps. Also attending the event were Farmingdale school students, officials from the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County and elected officials.

      As dignitaries spoke, the M8 was placed behind a replica of the concrete posts and barbed wire that became hated symbols of Nazi genocide in order to give the audience a sense of what it must have been like long ago in Germany. Among those who remembered quite well was Thea Gottesman Rumstein, a Viennese native who survived Auschwitz before being transferred to Mauthausen where M8 Greyhounds arrived at the front gate to liberate the camp on May 5, 1945.  “The day we were re-born,” Ms. Rumstein told the audience.

      The M8 was acquired through the financial support of Lawrence Kadish, Peter Kalikow, Jan Burman, Steven Krieger, Ed Blumenfeld, Donald Rechler, Stanley Silverstein, Gary Melius, Bennett Rechler, Alan Gerry and the family of the late William Lewi.

      Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto explained, “These ceremonies honoring those who liberated camps could not have come at a more urgent time.  Despite all the means of getting information to virtually every student around the world, the lessons of the Holocaust are in danger of being lost in a vast sea of trivia. We stand against that threat and we will continue to recall this murderous chapter in the history of mankind.”

       A unique effort in this dedication program was the unveiling of an illustrated story that chronicles the liberation of the Mauthausen slave camp by a column of M8 Greyhounds. Using original first person recollections, illustrator, artist and living historian Jim Hart drew a “comic strip” that will be used as an educational tool at schools throughout the region and in cooperation with the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center and corporate sponsors. He called his research into the drawing “haunting” but he has produced a “comic” that reaches its intended audience, school students, who are so often overloaded with digital information that they can miss compelling stories they need to truly understand and absorb their lessons. Liberating the survivors of the Holocaust is one of them.

      The late Nassau County Legislative Presiding Officer Peter Schmitt was among those had attended the event. His remarks stand in lasting tribute to what was his personal commitment to keeping the flame of freedom of alive when he stated, “I stand before you in recognition that each and every one of us must continue to bear witness – whether we were there or not. Whether our families suffered inside the camps or not. Whether we are Jewish or Christian. It remains a moral imperative that we all continue to stand witness against those who perpetrated the Holocaust.”